Definition of Creepiness

1. Noun. An uneasy sensation as of insects creeping on your skin.




Definition of Creepiness

1. n. An uneasy sensation as of insects creeping on the skin.

Definition of Creepiness

1. Noun. The state of being creepy ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Creepiness

1. [n -ES]

Creepiness Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Creepiness

creeped
creeper
creepers
creepeth
creephole
creepholes
creepie
creepier
creepies
creepiest
creepified
creepifies
creepify
creepifying
creepily
creepiness
creepinesses
creeping
creeping Charlie
creeping Jenny
creeping St John's wort
creeping bellflower
creeping bent
creeping bugle
creeping crowfoot
creeping elegance
creeping eruption

Literary usage of Creepiness

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The American Journal of Psychology by Granville Stanley Hall, Edward Bradford Titchener (1910)
"... creepiness, peculiar discomfort, and lack of ordinariness. The imaginations not thus accompanied were almost always images of commonplace objects, ..."

2. The Bookman (1906)
"The opening tale, which gives the book its title, is the most fantastic of the collection, and aside from the well-sustained note of creepiness, ..."

3. American Literature by Julian Willis Abernethy (1902)
"The atmosphere is one of midnight mystery, that induces the sensation of creepiness, and the prevailing tone is melancholy. Yet in spite of all this, ..."

4. The Gentleman's Magazine (1892)
"The “creepiness” of Edith's “little low voice, saying quietly to itself, ‘Oh, my God! ‘ as if a lost soul were flying about in the storm “; the hurried ..."

5. The American Journal of Psychology by Granville Stanley Hall, Edward Bradford Titchener (1910)
"... creepiness, peculiar discomfort, and lack of ordinariness. The imaginations not thus accompanied were almost always images of commonplace objects, ..."

6. The Bookman (1906)
"The opening tale, which gives the book its title, is the most fantastic of the collection, and aside from the well-sustained note of creepiness, ..."

7. American Literature by Julian Willis Abernethy (1902)
"The atmosphere is one of midnight mystery, that induces the sensation of creepiness, and the prevailing tone is melancholy. Yet in spite of all this, ..."

8. The Gentleman's Magazine (1892)
"The “creepiness” of Edith's “little low voice, saying quietly to itself, ‘Oh, my God! ‘ as if a lost soul were flying about in the storm “; the hurried ..."

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