Definition of Sequester

1. Verb. Requisition forcibly, as of enemy property. "The estate was sequestered"

Generic synonyms: Take
Related verbs: Attach, Confiscate, Impound, Seize



2. Verb. Take temporary possession of as a security, by legal authority. "The police confiscated the stolen artwork"
Exact synonyms: Attach, Confiscate, Impound, Seize
Generic synonyms: Take
Specialized synonyms: Condemn, Garnish, Garnishee, Distrain
Derivative terms: Attachment, Confiscation, Impounding, Impoundment, Seizure, Sequestration

3. Verb. Undergo sequestration by forming a stable compound with an ion. "The cations were sequestered"
Category relationships: Chemical Science, Chemistry
Generic synonyms: Change
Derivative terms: Sequestration

4. Verb. Keep away from others. "He sequestered himself in his study to write a book"
Exact synonyms: Seclude, Sequestrate, Withdraw
Generic synonyms: Insulate, Isolate
Related verbs: Adjourn, Retire, Withdraw
Derivative terms: Seclusion, Sequestration, Withdrawal, Withdrawer

5. Verb. Set apart from others. "The dentist sequesters the tooth he is working on"
Exact synonyms: Isolate, Keep Apart, Sequestrate, Set Apart
Generic synonyms: Disunite, Divide, Part, Separate

Definition of Sequester

1. v. t. To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate.

2. v. i. To withdraw; to retire.

3. n. Sequestration; separation.

Definition of Sequester

1. Verb. To separate from all external influence. ¹

2. Verb. To separate in order to store. ¹

3. Verb. (chemistry) To prevent an ion in solution from behaving normally by forming a coordination compound ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sequester

1. [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Sequester

1. 1. To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate. "Formerly the goods of a defendant in chancery were, in the last resort, sequestered and detained to enforce the decrees of the court. And now the profits of a benefice are sequestered to pay the debts of ecclesiastics." (Blackstone) 2. To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc. "It was his tailor and his cook, his fine fashions and his French ragouts, which sequestered him." (South) 3. To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things. "I had wholly sequestered my civil affairss." (Bacon) 4. To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude; to withdraw; often used reflexively. "When men most sequester themselves from action." (Hooker) "A love and desire to sequester a man's self for a higher conversation." (Bacon) 5. (Chem) To bind, so as to make [a metal ion] unavailable in its normal form; said of chelating agents, such as EDTA, which, in a solution, bind tightly to multivalent metal cations, thereby lowering their effective concentration in solution. Compounds employed particularly for this purpose are called sequestering agents, or chelating agents. In biochemistry, sequestration is one means of reversibly inhibiting enzymes which depend on divalent metal cations (such as Magnesium) for their activity. Such agents are used, for example, to help preserve blood for storage and subsequent use in transfusion. 1. Sequestration; separation. 2. A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or referee. 3. Same as Sequestrum. Origin: F. Sequestrer, L. Sequestrare to give up for safe keeping, from sequester a depositary or trustee in whose hands the thing contested was placed until the dispute was settled. Cf. Sequestrate. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Sequester Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sequester

sequent
sequential
sequential analysis
sequential art
sequential compactness
sequential continuity
sequential file
sequential logic
sequential manual gearbox
sequential manual gearboxes
sequential operation
sequentiality
sequentially
sequents
sequester
sequesterable
sequestered
sequestering
sequesters
sequestra
sequestrable
sequestral
sequestrant
sequestrants
sequestrate
sequestrated
sequestrates
sequestrating
sequestration

Literary usage of Sequester

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A New Law Dictionary and Institute of the Whole Law: For the Use of Students by Archibald Brown (1874)
"Sequester. As used in the Civil Law signifies to renounce or disclaim, &c. As when a widow conies into Court and disclaims to have anything to do or to ..."

2. A Glossary: Or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to by Robert Nares (1859)
"Sequester, ». Sequestration, separation. I know it only in the following instance : This ... A sequester from liberty, fasting and prayer. Otk'llo, iii. 4. ..."

3. Roman Private Law in the Times of Cicero and of the Antonines by Henry John Roby (1902)
"A special use of deposit was when an object of dispute was handed over to a stakeholder (sequester) to keep, produce and deliver according to instructions. ..."

4. An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1893)
"Der., Sequester, to set aside or apart. (F., - L.) ' Him halh God the father specially ... Lat. sequester, a mediator ..."

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