Definition of Ablative absolute

1. Noun. A constituent in Latin grammar; a noun and its modifier can function as a sentence modifier.


Definition of Ablative absolute

1. Noun. (linguistics) A construction in Latin in which an independent phrase with a noun in the ablative case has a participle, expressed or implied, which agrees with it in gender, number and case – both words forming a clause grammatically unconnected with the rest of the sentence. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Ablative Absolute Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Ablative Absolute

ablaqueation
ablare
ablastemic
ablastin
ablastous
ablate
ablated
ablates
ablating
ablatio placentae
ablation
ablations
ablatitious
ablatival
ablative
ablative absolute (current term)
ablative absolutes
ablative case
ablative cases
ablatively
ablatives
ablativity
ablator
ablators
ablaut
ablauting
ablauts
ablaze
ablaze(p)
able

Literary usage of Ablative absolute

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. American Journal of Philology by Project Muse, JSTOR (Organization) (1904)
"THE ablative absolute IN THE EPISTLES OF CICERO, SENECA, PLINY AND PRONTO. In another article we discussed the use of Chiasmus in these writings,1 and here ..."

2. Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges: Founded on by Joseph Henry Allen, James Bradstreet Greenough (1903)
"This construction is called the ablative absolute:—l Caesar, acceptis litteris, ... The ablative absolute is an adverbial modifier of the predicate. ..."

3. A Latin Grammar for Schools and Colleges by Albert Harkness (1892)
"ablative absolute.1 431. A noun and a participle may be put in the Ablative to add to the ... The ablative absolute, much more common than the English ..."

4. The Rudiments of Latin and English Grammar: Designed to Facilitate the Study by Alexander Adam (1820)
"But as the participles of common verbs are seldom taken in a passive sense, we therefore rarely find them used in the ablative absolute. Obs. 3. ..."

5. A Practical Introduction to Latin Prose Composition by Thomas Kerchever Arnold (1908)
"THE ablative absolute. ONE of the commonest uses of the Latin participle is that called the ablative absolute. 419. A participle and substantive (or ..."

6. First Latin Book by Charles Wesley Bain (1898)
"Observe : 1. That the Latin ablative absolute corresponds to English Nominative Absolute. 2. That the ablative absolute is ..."

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