Definition of Acrimony

1. Noun. A rough and bitter manner.


Definition of Acrimony

1. n. A quality of bodies which corrodes or destroys others; also, a harsh or biting sharpness; as, the acrimony of the juices of certain plants.

Definition of Acrimony

1. Noun. A sharp and bitter hatred. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Acrimony

1. sharpness or bitterness of speech or temper [n -NIES]

Medical Definition of Acrimony

1. 1. A quality of bodies which corrodes or destroys others; also, a harsh or biting sharpness; as, the acrimony of the juices of certain plants. 2. Sharpness or severity, as of language or temper; irritating bitterness of disposition or manners. "John the Baptist set himself with much acrimony and indignation to baffle this senseless arrogant conceit of theirs." (South) Asperity and harshness arise from angry feelings, connected with a disregard for the feelings of others. Harshness usually denotes needless severity or an undue measure of severity. Acrimony is a biting sharpness produced by an imbittered spirit. Tartness denotes slight asperity and implies some degree of intellectual readiness. Tartness of reply; harshness of accusation; acrimony of invective. "In his official letters he expressed, with great acrimony, his contempt for the king's character." (Macaulay) "It is no very cynical asperity not to confess obligations where no benefit has been received." (Johnson) "A just reverence of mankind prevents the growth of harshness and brutality." (Shaftesbury) Synonym: Acrimony, Asperity, Harshness, Tartness. Origin: L. Acrimonia, fr. Acer, sharp: cf. F. Acrimonie. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Acrimony Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Acrimony Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Acrimony

acridness
acridnesses
acridology
acridone
acridone synthase
acridones
acridophosphine
acridophosphines
acriflavine
acriflavines
acrimonia
acrimonies
acrimonious
acrimoniously
acrimoniousness
acrimony (current term)
acrinol
acrisorcin
acrisy
acrita
acritan
acritarch
acritarchs
acrite
acritical
acritically
acritochromacy
acritude
acrity
acrivastine

Literary usage of Acrimony

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire by Edward Gibbon (1887)
"... and sentiment, aud divine power.13 For the truth of this prodigy he appeals to the public monuments of the city; and censures, with some acrimony, ..."

2. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann, Edward Aloysius Pace, Condé Bénoist Pallen, Thomas Joseph Shahan, John Joseph Wynne (1913)
"... the financial subsidy to Maynooth from the Statt underwent various changes and gave rise to debates ot considerable acrimony in the House of Commons. ..."

3. History of the War in the Peninsula and in the South of France: From the by William Francis Patrick Napier (1842)
"The Duke of Berry proposee to invade France, promising the aid of twenty thousand insurgents—Lord Wellington's views on this subject—His personal acrimony ..."

4. Life and Letters of Edwin Lawrence Godkin by Edwin Lawrence Godkin (1907)
"... and had replied with acrimony. When set right as to the facts, he made the following handsome apology: — BALAKLAVA, Dec. 3, 1854. ..."

5. The Monthly Review by Ralph Griffiths (1794)
"... which are certainly not capable of lh:athing acrimony, ... of an argument in favour of the demulcent quality of oil, namely, " That when an acrimony, ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Acrimony

Search for Acrimony on Dictionary.com!Search for Acrimony on Thesaurus.com!Search for Acrimony on Google!Search for Acrimony on Wikipedia!

Search