Definition of Astringency

1. Noun. A sharp astringent taste; the taste experience when a substance causes the mouth to pucker.




2. Noun. The ability to contract or draw together soft body tissues to check blood flow or restrict secretion of fluids.
Exact synonyms: Stypsis
Generic synonyms: Contractility
Attributes: Astringent, Nonastringent
Derivative terms: Astringent, Styptic

Definition of Astringency

1. n. The quality of being astringent; the power of contracting the parts of the body; that quality in medicines or other substances which causes contraction of the organic textures; as, the astringency of tannin.

Definition of Astringency

1. Noun. An astringent taste. ¹

2. Noun. That which acts as an astringent, causing contraction of soft tissue to restrict the flow of blood. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Astringency

1. [n -CIES]

Medical Definition of Astringency

1. The quality of being astringent; the power of contracting the parts of the body; that quality in medicines or other substances which causes contraction of the organic textures; as, the astringency of tannin. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Astringency Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Astringency

astrations
astray
astreated
astrict
astricted
astricting
astriction
astricts
astride
astriferous
astringe
astringed
astringence
astringences
astringencies
astringency (current term)
astringent
astringent drug
astringently
astringents
astringer
astringers
astringes
astringeth
astringing
astringingness
astro-
astroarchaeology
astrobabble
astroballistic

Literary usage of Astringency

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Manual of Pharmacology and Its Applications to Therapeutics and Toxicology by Torald Hermann Sollmann (1922)
"These act not only in virtue of their astringency, but also somewhat after the manner of inert dusting-powder, affording an artificial protective covering ..."

2. Cyclopædia of India and of Eastern and Southern Asia, Commercial, Industrial by Edward Balfour (1871)
"... astringency, is esteemed lets valable. The ordinary nuts have я thin brown riod, «nd in size are intermediate between ..."

3. Flora Medica; a Botanical Account of All the More Important Plants Used in by John Lindley (1838)
"Leaves employed in North America, on account of their astringency, externally, in cases of gangrene. ..."

4. Practical therapeutics by Edward John Waring (1866)
"with the astringency of Tannin. Рог internal use it is given in the form of Syrup (Iodine grs. xxx, ..."

5. Companion to the Botanical Magazine by Sir William Jackson Hooker (1835)
"... for the latter reason, does not roll itself into tubes, possesses little astringency, and is never gathered for sale : still it is said to be applied to ..."

6. The Minnesota Horticulturist by Minnesota State Horticultural Society (1901)
"... with but little astringency. But little, in fact, remains to make this a choice table fruit, and it certainly makes a good fruit for culinary use. ..."

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