Definition of Astrolabe

1. Noun. An early form of sextant.

Generic synonyms: Sextant

Definition of Astrolabe

1. n. An instrument for observing or showing the positions of the stars. It is now disused.

Definition of Astrolabe

1. Noun. An astronomical and navigational instrument for gauging the altitude of the Sun and stars. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Astrolabe

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Astrolabe

1. 1. An instrument for observing or showing the positions of the stars. It is now disused. Among the ancients, it was essentially the armillary sphere. A graduated circle with sights, for taking altitudes at sea, was called an astrolabe in the 18th century. It is now superseded by the quadrant and sextant. 2. A stereographic projection of the sphere on the plane of a great circle, as the equator, or a meridian; a planisphere. Origin: OE. Astrolabie, astrilabe, OF. Astrelabe, F. Astrolabe, LL. Astrolabium, fr. Gr.; star +, to take. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Astrolabe Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Astrolabe

astrogliosis
astrognosy
astrograph
astrographic
astrographies
astrographs
astrography
astroid
astroids
astroinformatics
astrointerferometer
astrointerferometers
astroite
astroites
astrokinetic
astrolabes
astrolater
astrolaters
astrolatry
astrolaw
astrolithology
astrologer
astrologers
astrologic
astrological
astrological sign
astrological signs
astrologically
astrologick

Literary usage of Astrolabe

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Encyclopaedia Britannica, a Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and edited by Hugh Chisholm (1910)
"The principle of the astrolabe is explained in fig. 2. There were two kinds,—spherical ... Principle of the astrolabe. If a j—-P solid circle be fixed in ..."

2. English Literature from Widsith to the Death of Chaucer: A Source Book by Allen Rogers Benham (1916)
"The first is this: trust well that all the conclusions that have been found, or else possibly might be found in so noble an instrument as the astrolabe, ..."

3. Archaeologia, Or, Miscellaneous Tracts Relating to Antiquity by Society of Antiquaries of London (1851)
"The instrument is a Clock and standard astrolabe. ... On the pillar, or stem, which supports the dial and astrolabe, is engraved a calendar, ..."

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