Definition of Baywood

1. a coarse mahogany [n -S]



Baywood Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Baywood

bayonetings
bayonets
bayonetted
bayonetting
bayonettings
bayou
bayous
bayplan
bayplans
bays
bayside
bayt
bayted
bayting
bayts
baywood (current term)
baywoods
baza
bazaar
bazaarlike
bazaars
bazar
bazars
bazas
bazazz
bazazzes
baze
bazhenovite
bazillion
bazillionaire

Literary usage of Baywood

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Annual Report by United States Civil Service Commission (1907)
"John C. Murphy, of baywood, Va., who competed in a rural-carrier examination December 10, 1904, and subsequently offered the sum of $100 for an appointment, ..."

2. Muskingum Legends: With Other Sketches and Papers Descriptive of the Young by Stephen Powers (1871)
"Harry baywood and Sargent were always together, as absolutely indispensable to each other as the sine to the cosine. In the weekly spelling-schools, ..."

3. The Art of Pattern-making: A Comprehensive Treatise. Numerous Examples of by Issac McKim Chase (1903)
"In building the pattern of the blade it is advisable to have the two outside edges of baywood. Beginning at the bottom, which will be the after edge of the ..."

4. Henley's Encyclopædia of Practical Engineering and Allied Trades: A by Joseph Gregory Horner (1907)
"The other main variety is called baywood, or Honduras mahogany, and comes from the vicinity of Honduras Bay. Spanish mahogany is chiefly used in cabinet ..."

5. Cheshire Notes and Queries (1887)
"John de Arderne, in another deed without date, gait claimed to Thomas de baywood and his heirs all his rights to certain waste lands in Alderley. ..."

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