Definition of Bismuth

1. Noun. A heavy brittle diamagnetic trivalent metallic element (resembles arsenic and antimony chemically); usually recovered as a by-product from ores of other metals.

Exact synonyms: Atomic Number 83, Bi
Generic synonyms: Metal, Metallic Element
Derivative terms: Bismuthal



Definition of Bismuth

1. n. One of the elements; a metal of a reddish white color, crystallizing in rhombohedrons. It is somewhat harder than lead, and rather brittle; masses show broad cleavage surfaces when broken across. It melts at 507° Fahr., being easily fused in the flame of a candle. It is found in a native state, and as a constituent of some minerals. Specific gravity 9.8. Atomic weight 207.5. Symbol Bi.

Definition of Bismuth

1. Noun. a chemical element (''symbol'' Bi) with an atomic number of 83. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Bismuth

1. a metallic element [n -S]

Medical Definition of Bismuth

1. One of the elements; a metal of a reddish white colour, crystallizing in rhombohedrons. It is somewhat harder than lead, and rather brittle; masses show broad cleavage surfaces when broken across. It melts at 507 deg Fahr, being easily fused in the flame of a candle. It is found in a native state, and as a constituent of some minerals. Specific gravity 9.8. Atomic weight 207.5. Symbol Bi. Chemically, bismuth (with arsenic and antimony is intermediate between the metals and nonmetals; it is used in thermo-electric piles, and as an alloy with lead and tin in the fusible alloy or metal. Bismuth is the most diamagnetic substance known. Bismuth glance, bismuth sulphide; bismuthinite. Bismuth ocher, a native bismuth oxide; bismite. Origin: Ger. Bismuth, wismuth: cf. F. Bismuth. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Bismuth Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Bismuth

bisket
biskets
bisks
bislactone
bisligand
bisligands
bismar
bismarcks
bismark
bismars
bismer
bismetallated
bismillah
bismite
bismoclite
bismuth (current term)
bismuth aluminate
bismuth ammonium citrate
bismuth carbonate
bismuth chloride oxide
bismuth citrate
bismuth hydroxide
bismuth iodide
bismuth line
bismuth oxide
bismuth oxycarbonate
bismuth oxychloride
bismuth oxynitrate
bismuth salicylate
bismuth sodium tartrate

Literary usage of Bismuth

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Standard Methods of Chemical Analysis: A Manual of Analytical Methods and by Wilfred Welday Scott (1922)
"From a burette the bismuth nitrate sample is run into one of these containers ... (If no color is produced bismuth is absent.) The reagent in the adjacent ..."

2. A Dictionary of Applied Chemistry by Thomas Edward Thorpe (1921)
"bismuth oxide thus obtained is a ( 80 parts of water, tiller, wash aud dry the ... On addition of sugar to the solution, metallic bismuth is precipitated, ..."

3. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London by Royal Society (Great Britain) (1897)
"On the Electrical Resistivity of bismuth at the Temperature of Liquid Air." By JAMES DEWAR, LL.D., FRS, Fullerian Professor of Chemistry in the Royal ..."

4. A Manual of Pharmacology and Its Applications to Therapeutics and Toxicology by Torald Hermann Sollmann (1922)
"The literature of bismuth poisoning is also reviewed by WH Higgins, 1916; ... The use of the relatively enormous doses of bismuth subnitrate for ..."

5. Manual of Qualitative Chemical Analysis by C. Remigius Fresenius, Samuel William Johnson (1880)
"By heating with nitric acid they are converted into bismuth nil rate. 3. Most of the bismuth SALTS are non-volatile and are decomposed at a red heat. ..."

6. Journal of the American Chemical Society by American Chemical Society (1896)
"At least these methods gave Steen the best results. The separation of bismuth from lead frequently confronts the analyst, ..."

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