Definition of Closure

1. Noun. Approaching a particular destination; a coming closer; a narrowing of a gap. "The ship's rapid rate of closing gave them little time to avoid a collision"

Exact synonyms: Closing
Generic synonyms: Approach, Approaching, Coming
Derivative terms: Close, Close, Close, Close



2. Verb. Terminate debate by calling for a vote. "Cloture the discussion"
Exact synonyms: Cloture
Generic synonyms: End, Terminate
Derivative terms: Cloture

3. Noun. A rule for limiting or ending debate in a deliberative body.
Exact synonyms: Cloture, Gag Law, Gag Rule
Generic synonyms: Order, Parliamentary Law, Parliamentary Procedure, Rules Of Order
Specialized synonyms: Closure By Compartment, Guillotine
Derivative terms: Cloture

4. Noun. A Gestalt principle of organization holding that there is an innate tendency to perceive incomplete objects as complete and to close or fill gaps and to perceive asymmetric stimuli as symmetric.

5. Noun. Something settled or resolved; the outcome of decision making. "He needed to grieve before he could achieve a sense of closure"
Exact synonyms: Resolution, Settlement
Generic synonyms: Deciding, Decision Making
Derivative terms: Settle

6. Noun. An obstruction in a pipe or tube. "We had to call a plumber to clear out the blockage in the drainpipe"

7. Noun. The act of blocking.
Exact synonyms: Blockage, Occlusion
Generic synonyms: Obstruction
Specialized synonyms: Implosion
Derivative terms: Block, Block, Block, Block, Block, Close, Close, Close, Occlude

8. Noun. Termination of operations. "They regretted the closure of the day care center"
Exact synonyms: Closedown, Closing, Shutdown
Generic synonyms: Conclusion, Ending, Termination
Specialized synonyms: Plant Closing, Bank Closing, Layoff
Derivative terms: Close Down, Close, Close, Close, Close, Shut Down

Definition of Closure

1. n. The act of shutting; a closing; as, the closure of a chink.

Definition of Closure

1. Noun. An event or occurrence that signifies an ending. ¹

2. Noun. A feeling of completeness; the experience of an emotional conclusion, usually to a difficult period. ¹

3. Noun. A device to facilitate temporary and repeatable opening and closing. ¹

4. Noun. (computer science) An abstraction that represents a function within an environment, a context consisting of the variables that are both bound at a particular time during the execution of the program and that are within the function's scope. ¹

5. Noun. (mathematics) The smallest set that both includes a given subset and possesses some given property. ¹

6. Noun. (topology) (''of a set'') The smallest closed set which contains the given set. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Closure

1. to cloture [v -SURED, -SURING, -SURES] - See also: cloture

Medical Definition of Closure

1. 1. The completion of a reflex pathway. 2. The place of coupling between stimuli in the establishment of conditioned learning. 3. To achieve or experience a sense of completion in a mental task. (05 Mar 2000)

Closure Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Closure

closish
clost
closterovirus
clostridia
clostridial
clostridial myonecrosis
clostridiopeptidase A
clostridiopeptidase B
clostridium
clostridium botulinum
clostridium difficile
clostridium infections
clostridium perfringens
clostridium tetani
clostripain
closure (current term)
closure by compartment
closure principle
closured
closures
closuring
closylate
clot
clot-dissolving medications
clot buster
clot retraction
clot retraction time
clotbur
clotburs
clote

Literary usage of Closure

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Child Protective Services: A Guide for Caseworkers by Diane Depanfilis (1995)
"When the court is involved in a particular case and the CPS agency is considering closing the case, the court must approve case closure as well as terminate ..."

2. The Kinematics of Machinery: Outlines of a Theory of Machines by Franz Reuleaux (1876)
"We found force-closure to be always necessary, but to a different extent in different cases. In the case of the cord in Fig. 124 we required the absolute ..."

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