Definition of Discipline

1. Noun. A branch of knowledge. "Anthropology is the study of human beings"


2. Verb. Develop (children's) behavior by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control. "Is this dog trained?"
Exact synonyms: Check, Condition, Train
Generic synonyms: Develop, Make Grow
Specialized synonyms: Mortify
Related verbs: Groom, Prepare, Train
Derivative terms: Check, Conditioner, Trainee

3. Noun. A system of rules of conduct or method of practice. "For such a plan to work requires discipline"
Generic synonyms: System, System Of Rules

4. Verb. Punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience. "The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently"
Exact synonyms: Correct, Sort Out
Generic synonyms: Penalise, Penalize, Punish
Derivative terms: Correction, Corrective, Corrigible

5. Noun. The trait of being well behaved. "He insisted on discipline among the troops"
Generic synonyms: Trait
Specialized synonyms: Self-denial, Self-discipline, Control, Restraint
Derivative terms: Disciplinary
Antonyms: Indiscipline

6. Noun. Training to improve strength or self-control.
Generic synonyms: Grooming, Preparation, Training
Derivative terms: Disciplinary

7. Noun. The act of punishing. "The offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received"
Exact synonyms: Correction
Generic synonyms: Penalisation, Penalization, Penalty, Punishment
Specialized synonyms: Spanking
Derivative terms: Correct, Correctional, Disciplinary

Definition of Discipline

1. n. The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

2. v. t. To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

Definition of Discipline

1. Noun. A controlled behaviour; self-control ¹

2. Noun. An enforced compliance or control ¹

3. Noun. A systematic method of obtaining obedience ¹

4. Noun. A state of order based on submission to authority ¹

5. Noun. A punishment to train or maintain control ¹

6. Noun. A set of rules regulating behaviour ¹

7. Noun. A flagellation as a means of obtaining sexual gratification ¹

8. Noun. A specific branch of knowledge or learning ¹

9. Noun. A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs, or a sub-category of said activity. ¹

10. Verb. (transitive) To train someone by instruction and practice. ¹

11. Verb. (transitive) To teach someone to obey authority. ¹

12. Verb. (transitive) To punish someone in order to (re)gain control. ¹

13. Verb. (transitive) To impose order on someone. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Discipline

1. [v -PLINED, -PLINING, -PLINES]

Medical Definition of Discipline

1. 1. The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral. "Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity." (Bacon) "Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience." (C. J. Smith) 2. Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill. "Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part, Obey the rules and discipline of art." (Dryden) 3. Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience. "The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard." (Rogers) 4. Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc. "A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate s." (Macaulay) 5. Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training. "Giving her the discipline of the strap." (Addison) 6. The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge. (Bp. Wilkins) 7. The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member. 8. Self- inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge. 9. A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline. Synonym: Education, instruction, training, culture, correction, chastisement, punishment. Origin: F. Discipline, L. Disciplina, from discipulus. See Disciple. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Discipline Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Discipline

discipleship
discipleships
discipless
disciplesses
disciplic
disciplinable
disciplinableness
disciplinal
disciplinant
disciplinarian
disciplinarians
disciplinarily
disciplinarities
disciplinarity
disciplinary
disciplined
disciplineless
discipliner
discipliners
disciplines
discipling
disciplining
discission
discitis
disclaim
disclaimed
disclaimer
disclaimers
disclaiming

Literary usage of Discipline

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Henry Reeve (1899)
"CHAPTER XXV Of discipline in Democratic Armies IT is a very general opinion, especially in aristocratic countries, that the great social equality which ..."

2. The Montessori Method: Scientific Pedagogy as Applied to Child Education in by Maria Montessori, Henry Wyman Holmes (1912)
"The first dawning of real discipline comes through work. At a given moment it happens that ... That child has set foot upon the road leading to discipline. ..."

3. Education by Project Innovation (Organization) (1919)
"These two are closely and Vitally related; for good instruction without discipline is impossible; discipline without good instruction becomes formal and ..."

4. Annual Report by Correctional Association of New York (1870)
"Coercive discipline, as a main reliance, would disappear from a prison system created ... In framing a machinery of prison discipline, ingenuity has been, ..."

5. Critique of Pure Reason by Immanuel Kant (1887)
"But the reader must remark that, in this the second division of our Transcendental Critique, the discipline of pure reason is not directed to the content, ..."

6. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"Prussian prisons are on the whole well organized ; the discipline is severe yet ... Prison discipline has attracted close attention in the kingdom of Saxony ..."

7. Proceedings of the ... Annual Convention by Traveling Engineers' Association, Canadian School Trustees' Association (1896)
"Is not the discipline of Engineers by Fines or Suspensions Detrimental to the Service? To the President and Members of the Traveling Engineers' Association: ..."

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