Definition of Dislike

1. Noun. An inclination to withhold approval from some person or group.

Exact synonyms: Disapproval, Disfavor, Disfavour
Generic synonyms: Disposition, Inclination, Tendency
Specialized synonyms: Doghouse, Reprobation



2. Verb. Have or feel a dislike or distaste for. "Sam and Sue dislike the movie "; "I really dislike this salesman"
Entails: Disapprove
Specialized synonyms: Resent, Detest, Hate
Antonyms: Like

3. Noun. A feeling of aversion or antipathy. "My dislike of him was instinctive"

Definition of Dislike

1. v. t. To regard with dislike or aversion; to disapprove; to disrelish.

2. n. A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; -- the opposite of liking or fondness.

Definition of Dislike

1. Noun. An attitude or a feeling of distaste or aversion. ¹

2. Verb. (obsolete transitive) To displease; to offend. (In third-person only.) (defdate 16th-19th c.) ¹

3. Verb. (transitive) To have a feeling of aversion or antipathy towards; not to like. (defdate from 16th c.) ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Dislike

1. to regard with aversion [v -LIKED, -LIKING, -LIKES]

Medical Definition of Dislike

1. 1. To regard with dislike or aversion; to disapprove; to disrelish. "Every nation dislikes an impost." (Johnson) 2. To awaken dislike in; to displease. "Disliking countenance." . "It dislikes me." 3. A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; the opposite of liking or fondness. "God's grace . . . Gives him continual dislike to sin." (Hammond) "The hint malevolent, the look oblique, The obvious satire, or implied dislike." (Hannah More) "We have spoken of the dislike of these excellent women for Sheridan and Fox." (J. Morley) "His dislike of a particular kind of sensational stories." (A. W. Ward) 4. Discord; dissension. Synonym: Distaste, disinclination, disapprobation, disfavor, disaffection, displeasure, disrelish, aversion, reluctance, repugnance, disgust, antipathy. Dislike, Aversion, Reluctance, Repugnance, Disgust, Antipathy. Dislike is the more general term, applicable to both persons and things and arising either from feeling or judgment. It may mean little more than want of positive liking, but antipathy, repugnance, disgust, and aversion are more intense phases of dislike. Aversion denotes a fixed and habitual dislike, as, an aversion to or for business. Reluctance and repugnance denote a mental strife or hostility something proposed (repugnance being the stronger), as, a reluctance to make the necessary sacrifices, and a repugnance to the submission required. Disgust is repugnance either of taste or moral feeling, as, a disgust at gross exhibitions of selfishness. Antipathy is primarily an instinctive feeling of dislike of a thing, such as most persons feel for a snake. When used figuratively, it denotes a correspondent dislike for certain persons, modes of acting, etc. Men have an aversion to what breaks in upon their habits, a reluctance and repugnance to what crosses their will, a disgust at what offends their sensibilities, and are often governed by antipathies for which they can give no good reason. Origin: Disliked; Disliking. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Dislike Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Dislike

diskos
disks
diskzine
diskzines
disleaf
disleafed
disleafing
disleafs
disleal
disleave
disleaved
disleaves
disleaving
dislik't
dislikable
dislike (current term)
dislikeable
disliked
dislikeful
dislikelihood
disliken
dislikened
dislikeness
dislikening
dislikens
disliker
dislikers
dislikes
disliking
dislimb

Literary usage of Dislike

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Monthly Review by Ralph Griffiths (1801)
"I dislike destroying small places, and distressing poor families ; but I should like, when all are suffering, thai large sinecures, large salarieĀ», ..."

2. The pilgrim's progress from this world to that which is to come by John Bunyan (1853)
"... so the ware of Rome and her merchandise is greatly promoted in this fair; only our English nation, with some others, have taken a dislike thereat. ..."

3. The Sewanee Review by University of the South (1896)
"A FEW WORDS ABOUT THE POPULAR dislike OF ENGLAND. ... for inquiring into the causes of the manifest dislike for England by all classes in this country, ..."

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