Definition of Durdum

1. Noun. (archaic) noise, uproar, clamor ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Durdum

1. dirdum [n -S] - See also: dirdum

Durdum Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Durdum

duras
duration
duration tetany
durational
durational pattern
durational patterns
durationally
durations
durative
durative aspect
duratives
durbar
durbari
durbaris
durbars
durdum (current term)
durdums
dure
dured
dureful
dureless
durene
durenes
dures
duress
duresse
duresses
duressor
duressors
dureth

Literary usage of Durdum

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Songs and Ballads of Cumberland: To which are Added Dialect and Other by Sidney Gilpin (1866)
"The house, and aw the bits o' things, Will just be for the brudder; I only wish he'd meade t'em owre To Mary and her mudder ! " WE'VE HED SEC A durdum. ..."

2. The Poetical Works of Miss Susanna Blamire by Susanna Blamire, Henry Lonsdale, Patrick Maxwell (1842)
"The house, and aw the bits o' things, i Will just be for the brudder; \jf 11 only wish he'd meade tem owre To Mary and her mudder I" WE'VE HED SEC A durdum. ..."

3. The Worthies of Cumberland by Henry Lonsdale (1873)
"... Ve hed sec a durdum," realising the characteristic traits of bucolic simplicity awakened in the neighbouring vale by itinerant players and mountebanks. ..."

4. Publications by English Dialect Society (1880)
"Duffle, G. a coarse woollen cloth, generally blue, much worn in the days of home manufactures. Dumps, G. in so bad a humour as not to speak. durdum, o. when ..."

5. A Glossary of Words and Phrases Pertaining to the Dialect of Cumberland by William Dickinson (1880)
"durdum, a. when the country was divided into districts, each answerable for the good behaviour of its inhabitant«, meetings were hold at the doors of ..."

6. A Glossary of Words Used in the Wapentakes of Manley and Corringham by Edward Peacock (1877)
"Duffle, G. a coarse woollen cloth, generally blue, much worn in the days of home manufactures. Dumps, G. in so bad a humour as not to speak. durdum ..."

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