Definition of Erratic

1. Adjective. Liable to sudden unpredictable change. "A quicksilver character, cool and willful at one moment, utterly fragile the next"

Exact synonyms: Fickle, Mercurial, Quicksilver
Similar to: Changeable, Changeful
Derivative terms: Fickleness



2. Adjective. Having no fixed course. "A planetary vagabond"
Exact synonyms: Planetary, Wandering
Similar to: Unsettled

3. Adjective. Likely to perform unpredictably. "That beautiful but temperamental instrument the flute"
Exact synonyms: Temperamental
Similar to: Undependable, Unreliable

Definition of Erratic

1. a. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; -- hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars.

2. n. One who deviates from common and accepted opinions; one who is eccentric or preserve in his intellectual character.

Definition of Erratic

1. Adjective. unsteady, random; prone to unexpected changes; not consistent ¹

2. Noun. (geology) A rock moved from one location to another, usually by a glacier. ¹

3. Noun. Anything that has erratic characteristics. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Erratic

1. an eccentric person [n -S]

Medical Definition of Erratic

1. 1. Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars. "The earth and each erratic world." (Blackmore) 2. Deviating from a wise of the common course in opinion or conduct; eccentric; strange; queer; as, erratic conduct. 3. Irregular; changeable. "Erratic fever." Erratic blocks, gravel, etc. Masses of stone which have been transported from their original resting places by the agency of water, ice, or other causes. Erratic phenomena, the phenomena which relate to transported materials on the earth's surface. Origin: L. Erraticus, fr. Errare to wander: cf. F. Erratique. See Err. 1. One who deviates from common and accepted opinions; one who is eccentric or preserve in his intellectual character. 2. A rogue. 3. Any stone or material that has been borne away from its original site by natural agencies; especially, a large block or fragment of rock; a bowlder. In the plural the term is applied especially to the loose gravel and stones on the earth's surface, including what is called drift. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Erratic Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Erratic

errand-ghost
errand boy
errand boys
errand ghost
erranded
erranding
errands
errant
errantia
errantly
errantries
errantry
errants
errata
erratas
erratic (current term)
erratical
erratically
erraticalness
erraticism
erraticisms
erratick
erraticness
erratics
erration
errations
erratique
erratum
erraunt
erred

Literary usage of Erratic

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Report of the Annual Meeting (1908)
"Mr. Maule Cole's observations may ultimately prove to be outside the purview of a Committee dealing with erratic blocks, as it has been suggested that the ..."

2. Lake Superior: Its Physical Character, Vegetation, and Animals, Compared by Louis Agassiz, James Elliot Cabot (1850)
"So much has been said and written within the last fifteen years, upon the dispersion of erratic boulders and drift, both in Europe and America, ..."

3. The Sampling and Estimation of Ore in a Mine by Thomas Arthur Rickard (1903)
"erratic Samples.—The proper treatment of erratic samples is always a difficult matter. Mr. Rickard has given both sides of the subject very careful handling ..."

4. The Sampling and Estimation of Ore in a Mine by Thomas Arthur Rickard (1903)
"erratic Samples.—The proper treatment of erratic samples is always a difficult matter. Mr. Rickard has given both sides of the subject very careful handling ..."

5. Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Exhibiting a View of the Progressive by Robert Jameson, Sir William Jardine, Henry D Rogers (1842)
"I. THE erratic PHENOMENON. I have already said that the most striking discoveries, in relation to the erratic phenomenon, had been made in Britain. ..."

6. A Journey in Brazil by Louis Agassiz, Elizabeth Cabot Cary Agassiz (1886)
"GEORGE. — LEAVE Rio ox EXCURSION TO THE FORTALEZA DE SANTA ANNA. — LOCALITIES FOR erratic DRIFT ... erratic ..."

7. Travels in North America, in the Years 1841-2: With Geological Observations by Charles Lyell (1845)
"Distribution of erratic Blocks in Long Island.—Residence in New York.—Effects on Society of increased Intercourse of distant States. ..."

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