Definition of Excess

1. Noun. A quantity much larger than is needed.




2. Adjective. More than is needed, desired, or required. "Surplus cheese distributed to the needy"

3. Noun. Immoderation as a consequence of going beyond sufficient or permitted limits.

4. Noun. The state of being more than full.
Exact synonyms: Overabundance, Surfeit
Generic synonyms: Fullness
Derivative terms: Surfeit, Surfeit

5. Noun. Excessive indulgence. "The child was spoiled by overindulgence"
Exact synonyms: Overindulgence
Generic synonyms: Humoring, Indulgence, Indulging, Pampering
Derivative terms: Overindulge, Overindulgent

Definition of Excess

1. n. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or proper; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light.

Definition of Excess

1. Noun. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or proper; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light. ¹

2. Noun. The degree or amount by which one thing or number exceeds another; remainder; as, the difference between two numbers is the excess of one over the other. ¹

3. Noun. An undue indulgence of the appetite; transgression of proper moderation in natural gratifications; intemperance; dissipation. ¹

4. Noun. (geometry) Spherical excess, the amount by which the sum of the three angles of a spherical triangle exceeds two right angles. The spherical excess is proportional to the area of the triangle. ¹

5. Noun. (British insurance) A condition on an insurance policy by which the insured pays for the first part of any claim, in exchange for a lower premium. ¹

6. Adjective. More than is normal, necessary or specified ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Excess

1. to eliminate the position of [v -ED, -ING, -ES]

Medical Definition of Excess

1. 1. The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or prover; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light. "To gild refined gold, to paint the lily, To throw a perfume on the violet, . . . Is wasteful and ridiculous excess." (Shak) "That kills me with excess of grief, this with excess of joy." (Walsh) 2. An undue indulgence of the appetite; transgression of proper moderation in natural gratifications; intemperance; dissipation. "Be not drunk with wine, wherein is excess." (Eph. V. 18) "Thy desire . . . Leads to no excess That reaches blame." (Milton) 3. The degree or amount by which one thing or number exceeds another; remainder; as, the difference between two numbers is the excess of one over the other. Spherical excess, the amount by which the sum of the three angles of a spherical triangle exceeds two right angles. The spherical excess is proportional to the area of the triangle. Origin: OE. Exces, excess, ecstasy, L. Excessus a going out, loss of self-possession, fr. Excedere, excessum, to go out, go beyond: cf. F. Exces. See Exceed. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Excess Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Excess

excerped
excerping
excerps
excerpt
excerpta
excerpted
excerpter
excerpters
excerpting
excerption
excerptions
excerptive
excerptor
excerptors
excerpts
excess (current term)
excess annual growth
excess lactate
excess return
excessed
excesses
excessing
excessive
excessive number
excessive numbers
excessively
excessiveness
excessivenesses
excetera
exchangable

Literary usage of Excess

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1897)
"Taking the cities separately, the majority had more females than males, but the following eleven had an excess of males : Buffalo, Chicago, Cleveland, ..."

2. The Nicomachean Ethics of Aristotle by Aristotle, Robert Williams (1869)
"One might as well insist upon a mean and an excess and a defect of injustice, and of cowardice, and of debauchery ; so making a mean in an absolute excess ..."

3. Papers and Proceedings of the Annual Meeting by American Economic Association (1920)
"BRITISH EXPERIENCE WITH excess ... only invention of consequence developed during the war in the field of finance is the special taxation of excess profits. ..."

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