Definition of Farandole

1. Noun. A lively dance from Provence; all the dancers join hands and execute various figures.

Generic synonyms: Folk Dance, Folk Dancing



Definition of Farandole

1. n. A rapid dance in six- eight time in which a large number join hands and dance in various figures, sometimes moving from room to room. It originated in Provence.

Definition of Farandole

1. Noun. A lively chain dance in 6/8 time, of Proven├žal origin. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Farandole

1. [n -S]

Farandole Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Farandole

faradization
faradize
faradized
faradizer
faradizers
faradizes
faradizing
faradocontractility
faradomuscular
faradopalpation
faradopuncture
faradotherapy
farads
faralimomab
farand
farandole (current term)
farandoles
farang
farangs
farantly
faravahar
faraway
farawayness
faraways
farb
farblondjet
farbrengen
farby
farce
farce comedy

Literary usage of Farandole

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Dancing by Lilly Grove Frazer, Frazer (Lily Grove), Lilly Grove, Percy Macquoid (1895)
"As it proceeded the farandole increased, all those carried away by the rhythm ... Another dance of Provence, similar to the farandole, is Les Olivettes, ..."

2. The Century Illustrated Monthly Magazine by Roy J. Friedman Mark Twain Collection (Library of Congress) (1913)
"And when this rite was ended, the music shifted to a livelier key and straightway a farandole was formed. On the whole, a long and narrow steamboat is not a ..."

3. A Dictionary of Music and Musicians (A.D. 1450-1880) by George Grove, John Alexander Fuller-Maitland (1889)
"The farandole is usually danced at all the great feasts in the towns of Provence, ... In the latter the farandole is preceded by the huge effigy of a ..."

4. A Dictionary of Music and Musicians (A.D. 1450-1889): ...edited by Sir by George Grove, John Alexander Fuller-Maitland (1890)
"The farandole is usually danced at all the great feasts in the towns of ... The music of the farandole is in 6-8 time, with a strongly accentuated rhythm. ..."

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