Definition of Flamboyant

1. Noun. Showy tropical tree or shrub native to Madagascar; widely planted in tropical regions for its immense racemes of scarlet and orange flowers; sometimes placed in genus Poinciana.




2. Adjective. Marked by ostentation but often tasteless. "A splashy half-page ad"
Exact synonyms: Showy, Splashy
Similar to: Ostentatious, Pretentious
Derivative terms: Flamboyance, Show, Showiness, Splash, Splashiness

3. Adjective. Elaborately or excessively ornamented. "The senator's florid speech"
Exact synonyms: Aureate, Florid
Similar to: Fancy
Derivative terms: Flamboyance, Floridness

Definition of Flamboyant

1. a. Characterized by waving or flamelike curves, as in the tracery of windows, etc.; -- said of the later (15th century) French Gothic style.

Definition of Flamboyant

1. Adjective. Showy, bold or audacious in behaviour, appearance, etc. ¹

2. Adjective. (architecture) Referred to as the final stage of French Gothic architecture from the 14th to the 16th centuries. ¹

3. Noun. A showy tropical tree, the royal poinciana (''Delonix regia'') ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Flamboyant

1. [n -S]

Flamboyant Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Flamboyant

flambeed
flambeeing
flambees
flambeing
flamberg
flambergasted
flamberge
flambergen
flamberges
flambergs
flambes
flamboyance
flamboyances
flamboyancies
flamboyancy
flamboyant (current term)
flamboyant tree
flamboyantly
flamboyants
flamboyer
flamboyers
flame
flame-flower
flame-out
flame-retardant
flame arc
flame bait
flame bush
flame cell
flame durrajong

Literary usage of Flamboyant

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A History of Architecture by Russell Sturgis, Arthur Lincoln Frothingham (1915)
"In England, as will appear, all the elements of the flamboyant existed in the later decorated style before 1350. Without denying the transmuting hand of ..."

2. A History of Architecture by Russell Sturgis, Arthur Lincoln Frothingham (1915)
"In England, as will appear, all the elements of the flamboyant existed in the later decorated style before 1350. Without denying the transmuting hand of ..."

3. The Archaeological Journal by British Archaeological Association (1906)
"Ce n'est donc pas là que le style flamboyant s'est créé. ... 173 : " The history of the origin of style flamboyant, n'a jamais fait l'objet French ..."

4. An essay on the origin and development of window tracery in England by Edward Augustus Freeman (1851)
"Nor is this to be wondered at, as the English flamboyant is, ... flamboyant tracery, or something having a very flamboyant effect, may indeed", ..."

5. An Introduction to the Study of Gothic Architecture by John Henry Parker (1877)
"or quatrefoils are almost universal, until the flowing lines of the flamboyant style were introduced. 173. Bayeux Cathedral, e. 1300. ..."

6. Medieval Architecture: Its Origins and Development, with Lists of Monuments by Arthur Kingsley Porter (1909)
"Furthermore, paradoxical as it may seem, flamboyant architecture came into being at a moment when building activity in France — especially in those northern ..."

7. Preaching and Sermon Construction by Paul Bertie Bull (1922)
"Avoid a flamboyant Style.—By which we mean • style so rich in meretricious ornament that ... Mr. HG Wells, in describing the arrival of a flamboyant lady, ..."

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