Definition of Groove

1. Noun. A long narrow furrow cut either by a natural process (such as erosion) or by a tool (as e.g. a groove in a phonograph record).

Exact synonyms: Channel
Specialized synonyms: Dado, Flute, Fluting, Quirk, Rabbet, Rebate, Track, Rut, Stria, Striation, Washout
Generic synonyms: Depression, Impression, Imprint



2. Verb. Make a groove in, or provide with a groove. "Groove a vinyl record"
Specialized synonyms: Dado, Mill
Generic synonyms: Incise
Derivative terms: Groover, Grooving

3. Noun. A settled and monotonous routine that is hard to escape. "They fell into a conversational rut"
Exact synonyms: Rut
Generic synonyms: Modus Operandi, Routine

4. Verb. Hollow out in the form of a furrow or groove. "Furrow soil"
Exact synonyms: Furrow, Rut
Generic synonyms: Cut Into, Delve, Dig, Turn Over
Derivative terms: Furrow, Rut

5. Noun. (anatomy) any furrow or channel on a bodily structure or part.
Exact synonyms: Vallecula
Generic synonyms: Body Part
Specialized synonyms: Costal Groove, Fissure
Category relationships: Anatomy, General Anatomy

Definition of Groove

1. n. A furrow, channel, or long hollow, such as may be formed by cutting, molding, grinding, the wearing force of flowing water, or constant travel; a depressed way; a worn path; a rut.

2. v. t. To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow.

Definition of Groove

1. Noun. A long, narrow channel or depression; e.g., such a slot cut into a hard material to provide a location for an engineering component, a tyre groove, or a geological channel or depression. ¹

2. Noun. A fixed routine ¹

3. Noun. The middle of the strike zone in baseball where a pitch is most easily hit ¹

4. Noun. A pronounced, enjoyable rhythm ¹

5. Verb. To cut a groove or channel in; to form into channels or grooves; to furrow. ¹

6. Verb. To create, dance to, or enjoy rhythmic music. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Groove

1. to form a groove (a long, narrow depression) [v GROOVED, GROOVING, GROOVES]

Medical Definition of Groove

1. 1. A furrow, channel, or long hollow, such as may be formed by cutting, molding, grinding, the wearing force of flowing water, or constant travel; a depressed way; a worn path; a rut. 2. Hence: The habitual course of life, work, or affairs; fixed routine. "The gregarious trifling of life in the social groove." (J. Morley) 3. [See Grove. A shaft or excavation. Origin: D. Groef, groeve; akin to E. Grove. See Grove. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Groove Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Groove

groom-to-be
groomed
groomee
groomees
groomer
groomers
groomings
grooms
groomsman
groomsmen
groomzilla
groop
grooper
groopers
groove (current term)
groove for arch of aorta
groove for auditory tube
groove for inferior petrosal sinus
groove for inferior venae cava
groove for middle temporal artery
groove for radial nerve
groove for sigmoid sinus
groove for spinal nerve
groove for subclavian vein
groove for superior petrosal sinus
groove for superior sagittal sinus
groove for superior vena cava
groove for tendon of flexor hallucis longus
groove for tendon of peroneus longus muscle

Literary usage of Groove

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"In Noctiluca a deep groove is formed on one side of the spherical body, from the bottom of which springs the thick transversely striated proboscis or "big ..."

2. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"Both the longitudinal and the transverse groove are well seen 2. ... The transverse groove well seen. 12 The sanie species In the normal state. ..."

3. Dyke's Automobile and Gasoline Engine Encyclopedia by Andrew Lee Dyke (1920)
"After lapping, the ring should be immersed in clean gasoline and fitted to the groove. Not any groove, but the groove which it nearly fitted before. ..."

4. The Century Dictionary: An Encyclopedic Lexicon of the English Language by William Dwight Whitney (1889)
"When a given key is struck, its pallet is opened, and the groove filled with ... Whether all the pipes connected with the groove are sounded or not depends ..."

5. The American Agriculturist (1847)
"4 groove, and the board in No. 5 groove pushed back even with No. 9 sieve. ... 6 groove—give it the middle shake, and open the air slides. ..."

6. Quain's Elements of Anatomy by Jones Quain, Edward Albert Sharpey-Schäfer, George Dancer Thane (1890)
"produce the groove which is enclosed between them. The groove which is thus early formed in front of, but not, as was formerly supposed, in continuity with ..."

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