Definition of Hatch

1. Noun. The production of young from an egg.

Exact synonyms: Hatching
Generic synonyms: Birth, Birthing, Giving Birth, Parturition



2. Verb. Emerge from the eggs. "Young birds, fish, and reptiles hatch"
Related verbs: Brood, Cover, Incubate
Generic synonyms: Be Born
Derivative terms: Hatchery, Hatching

3. Noun. Shading consisting of multiple crossing lines.
Exact synonyms: Crosshatch, Hachure, Hatching
Generic synonyms: Shading
Derivative terms: Crosshatch

4. Verb. Devise or invent. "Did he hatch his major works over a short period of time?"; "No-one had ever thought of such a clever piece of software"
Exact synonyms: Concoct, Dream Up, Think Of, Think Up
Specialized synonyms: Idealise, Idealize, Cook Up, Fabricate, Invent, Make Up, Manufacture
Generic synonyms: Create By Mental Act, Create Mentally
Derivative terms: Concoction

5. Noun. A movable barrier covering a hatchway.
Specialized synonyms: Cargo Hatch
Group relationships: Hatchway, Opening, Scuttle
Generic synonyms: Movable Barrier

6. Verb. Inlay with narrow strips or lines of a different substance such as gold or silver, for the purpose of decorating.
Category relationships: Handicraft
Generic synonyms: Inlay

7. Verb. Draw, cut, or engrave lines, usually parallel, on metal, wood, or paper. "Hatch the sheet"
Generic synonyms: Line
Derivative terms: Hachure, Hatching

8. Verb. Sit on (eggs). "The female covers the eggs"
Exact synonyms: Brood, Cover, Incubate
Generic synonyms: Multiply, Procreate, Reproduce
Related verbs: Breed, Cover
Entails: Sit, Sit Down
Derivative terms: Brood, Brooder, Incubation, Incubator

Definition of Hatch

1. v. t. To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and engraving. See Hatching.

2. v. t. To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as, the young when hatched.

3. v. i. To produce young; -- said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; -- said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.

4. n. The act of hatching.

5. n. A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge.

6. v. t. To close with a hatch or hatches.

Definition of Hatch

1. Noun. A horizontal door in a floor or ceiling. ¹

2. Noun. A trapdoor. ¹

3. Noun. An opening in a wall at window height for the purpose of serving food or other items. A pass through. ¹

4. Noun. A small door in large mechanical structures and vehicles such as aircraft and spacecraft often provided for access for maintenance. ¹

5. Noun. A narrow passageway between the decks of a ship or submarine. ¹

6. Noun. (slang) A gullet. ¹

7. Verb. (transitive) To close with a hatch or hatches. ¹

8. Verb. (intransitive) (of young animals) To emerge from an egg. ¹

9. Verb. (intransitive) (of eggs) To break open when a young animal emerges from it. ¹

10. Verb. (transitive) To incubate eggs; to cause to hatch. ¹

11. Verb. (transitive) To devise. (qualifier hatch a plan) ¹

12. Noun. (context: poultry) A group of birds that emerged from eggs at a specified time. ¹

13. Noun. (Often as ''Mayfly hatch'') The phenomenon, lasting 1-2 days, of large clouds of mayflies appearing in one location (to mate, having reached maturity). ¹

14. Noun. (informal) As in the phrase "'''hatched''', matched, and dispatched." A birth, the birth records (in the newspaper). ¹

15. Verb. (transitive) To shade an area of a drawing or diagram with fine parallel lines, particularly with lines which cross each other: '''cross-hatch'''. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Hatch

1. to bring forth young from an egg [v -ED, -ING, -ES]

Medical Definition of Hatch

1. To produce young; said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc. 1. To cross with lines in a peculiar manne in drawing and engraving. See Hatching. "Shall win this sword, silvered and hatched." (Chapman) "Those hatching strokes of the pencil." (Dryden) 2. To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep. "His weapon hatched in blood." (Beau. & Fl) Origin: F. Hacher to chop, hack. See Hash. 1. A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge. "In at the window, or else o'er the hatch." (Shak) 2. A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish. 3. A flood gate; a a sluice gate. 4. A bedstead. 5. An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway; also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in closing such an opening. 6. An opening into, or in search of, a mine. Booby hatch, Buttery hatch, Companion hatch, etc. See Booby, Buttery, etc. To batten down the hatches, to lay tarpaulins over them, and secure them with battens. To be under hatches, to be confined below in a vessel; to be under arrest, or in slavery, distress, etc. Origin: OE. Hacche, AS. Haec, cf. Haca the bar of a door, D. Hek gate, Sw. Hack coop, rack, Dan. Hekke manger, rack. Prob. Akin to E. Hook, and first used of something made of pieces fastened together. Cf. Heck, Hack a frame. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Hatch Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Hatch

hat shop
hat stand
hat tip
hat tournament
hat tree
hat trees
hat trick
hat tricks
hatable
hatakikomi
hatbands
hatbox
hatboxes
hatbrush
hatch (current term)
hatch, match and despatch
hatch-boat
hatch out
hatchabilities
hatchability
hatchable
hatchback
hatchbacks
hatchboat
hatchboats
hatcheck
hatcheck girl
hatchecks
hatched

Literary usage of Hatch

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. South Eastern Reporter by West Virginia Supreme Court of Appeals, West Publishing Company, South Carolina Supreme Court (1904)
"The defendant insisted that the Injury was occasioned by the negligence of a fellow servant; contended that the hatch ti-mler was present; denied that there ..."

2. An Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1893)
"Not found earlier, but formed from the sb. hatch discussed ... In German, we have hecken, to hatch, from the sb. hecke, a breeding-cage. ..."

3. The New England Historical and Genealogical Register (1916)
"1636 Alice daughter of Thomas hatch and Lydia his wife 25 September. Marriage 1576 Richard Wills and Winefred hatch 18 June. ..."

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