Definition of Hindrance

1. Noun. Something immaterial that interferes with or delays action or progress.




2. Noun. Any obstruction that impedes or is burdensome.

3. Noun. The act of hindering or obstructing or impeding.
Exact synonyms: Hinderance, Interference
Generic synonyms: Act, Deed, Human Action, Human Activity
Specialized synonyms: Foiling, Frustration, Thwarting, Antagonism, Obstruction, Complication, Deterrence, Bar, Prevention
Derivative terms: Interfere

Definition of Hindrance

1. n. The act of hindering, or the state of being hindered.

Definition of Hindrance

1. Noun. Something which hinders: something that holds back or causes problems with something else. ¹

2. Noun. The state or act of hindering something ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Hindrance

1. [n -S]

Hindrance Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Hindrance

hindgut
hindguts
hindhead
hindheads
hindleg
hindlegs
hindleys screw
hindlimb
hindlimb suspension
hindlimbs
hindmilk
hindquarter
hindquarter amputation
hindquarters
hindrance (current term)
hindrances
hindraunce
hindre
hinds
hindshank
hindshanks
hindsight
hindsight is 20/20
hindsightly
hindsights
hinduism
hindward
hindwater
hindwing

Literary usage of Hindrance

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Botanical Gazette by University of Chicago, JSTOR (Organization) (1896)
"By use of Pfeffer's method of confining parts in plaster of Paris casts, the author investigated the action resulting from mechanical hindrance of the ..."

2. The Life of Samuel Johnson, LL.D. by James Boswell (1826)
"I am glad of your hindrance in your Spenserian design', yet I would not have it delayed. Three hours a day stolen from sleep and amusement will produce it. ..."

3. Primitive Culture: Researches Into the Development of Mythology, Philosophy by Sir Edward Burnett Tylor (1891)
"... and Law — Religion— Action of the Science of Culture, as a means of furthering progress and removing hindrance, effective in the course of Civilization. ..."

4. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Edward Aloysius Pace, Charles George Herbermann (1922)
"An irregularity, that is, a hindrance tP the recep- (Acta Ар. Sedis, 1919, p. 480). In answer to another which an ordinary cannot dispense, ..."

5. Journal of the American Medical Association by American Medical Association (1890)
"Our contemporary admits that we practically allow Frenchmen to practice in England without let or hindrance, but says that we do so because the privilege is ..."

6. Critical Miscellanies by John Morley (1904)
"Yet we know that with Mr. Mill as with Turgot this deep distrust of sect was no hindrance to the most careful systematisation of opinion and conduct. ..."

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