Definition of Huckleberry

1. Noun. Any of various dark-fruited as distinguished from blue-fruited blueberries.

Generic synonyms: Blueberry, Blueberry Bush



2. Noun. Any of several shrubs of the genus Gaylussacia bearing small berries resembling blueberries.

3. Noun. Blue-black berry similar to blueberries and bilberries of the eastern United States.
Generic synonyms: Berry
Group relationships: Black Huckleberry, Gaylussacia Baccata

Definition of Huckleberry

1. n. The edible black or dark blue fruit of several species of the American genus Gaylussacia, shrubs nearly related to the blueberries (Vaccinium), and formerly confused with them. The commonest huckelberry comes from G. resinosa.

Definition of Huckleberry

1. Noun. A small round fruit of a dark blue or red color of several plants in the related genera ''Vaccinium'' and ''Gaylussacia''. ¹

2. Noun. A shrub growing this fruit. ¹

3. Noun. (idiomatic) A small amount, as in the phrase huckleberry above a persimmon. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Huckleberry

1. [n -RIES]

Medical Definition of Huckleberry

1. The edible black or dark blue fruit of several species of the American genus Gaylussacia, shrubs nearly related to the blueberries (Vaccinium), and formerly confused with them. The commonest huckelberry comes from G. Resinosa. The shrub that bears the berries. Synonym: whortleberry. Squaw huckleberry. See Deeberry. Origin: Cf. Whortleberry. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Huckleberry Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Huckleberry

hubs
huc
huced
huchen
hucing
huck
huckaback
huckabacks
huckabuck
huckabucks
hucked
hucker
hucking
huckleberries
huckleberry (current term)
huckleberry above a persimmon
huckleberry oak
hucklebucks
huckles
hucks
hucksterage
huckstered
hucksterer
hucksterers
huckstering
hucksterish
hucksterism

Literary usage of Huckleberry

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Library Journal by American Library Association, Library Association, Richard Rogers Bowker, Charles Ammi Cutter (1907)
""No, no," she says, "Tom Sawyer, and you, you horrid huckleberry Finn, you mustn't come here. All the boys and girls in here are good and pious ; they have ..."

2. Sharps and Flats by Eugene Field (1900)
"Tribute to the huckleberry March 27, 1885 THE Hon. Edward S. Phelps, recently appointed minister to England, is a poet— perhaps not as great a poet as James ..."

3. How to Know the Wild Flowers: A Guide to the Names, Haunts, and Habits of by Frances Theodora Parsons, Marion Satterlee (1900)
"Greenish-white or purplish ; suggesting somewhat those of the blueberry and huckleberry, but noticeable especially for their protruding stamens. Fruit. ..."

4. The Library and the Librarian: A Selection of Articles from the Boston by Edmund Lester Pearson (1910)
"No, no," she says, " Tom Sawyer, and you, you horrid huckleberry Finn, you musn't come here. All the boys and girls in here are good and pious; ..."

5. Mrs. Putnam's Receipt Book: And Young Housekeeper's Assistant by E. Putnam (1869)
"BAKED huckleberry PUDDING. One quart of huckleberries, one teaspoonful of soda dissolved ... ANOTHER huckleberry PUDDING. Make some cream of tartar dough, ..."

6. The Cambridge History of American Literature by William Peterfield Trent (1921)
"In the second class go Roughing It, Tom Sawyer, Life on the Mississippi, huckleberry Finn, Adam's Diary, and Eve's Diary; and from such work has proceeded ..."

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