Definition of Imbibition

1. Noun. (chemistry) the absorption of a liquid by a solid or gel.

Category relationships: Chemical Science, Chemistry
Generic synonyms: Absorption, Soaking Up
Derivative terms: Imbibe



2. Noun. The act of consuming liquids.
Exact synonyms: Drinking, Imbibing
Generic synonyms: Consumption, Ingestion, Intake, Uptake
Specialized synonyms: Gulping, Guzzling, Swilling, Potation
Derivative terms: Drink, Imbibe, Imbibe

Definition of Imbibition

1. n. The act or process of imbibing, or absorbing; as, the post-mortem imbibition of poisons.

Definition of Imbibition

1. Noun. the act of imbibing. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Imbibition

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Imbibition

1. 1. Absorption of fluid by a solid body without resultant chemical change in either. 2. Taking up of water by a gel, thereby increasing its size. Origin: L. Im-bibo, to drink in (in + bibo) (05 Mar 2000)

Imbibition Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Imbibition Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Imbibition

imbenchings
imber-goose
imberb
imbetween
imbezzle
imbezzled
imbezzles
imbezzling
imbibe
imbibed
imbiber
imbibers
imbibes
imbibing
imbibings
imbibition (current term)
imbibitional
imbibitions
imbition
imbitions
imbitter
imbittered
imbitterer
imbitterers
imbittering
imbitterment
imbitterments
imbitters
imbizo
imbizos

Literary usage of Imbibition

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society Held at Philadelphia for by American Philosophical Society (1917)
"Experimental species were chosen concerning which much was known as to their respiration, transpiration, imbibition capacity and chemical composition. ..."

2. The Nature of Solution by Harry Clary Jones, Ebenezer Emmet Reed (1917)
"Before leaving the subject of imbibition, the fact should be mentioned that certain gels imbibe liquids other than water. Thus, caoutchouc imbibes carbon ..."

3. Plant Physiology: With Special Reference to Plant Production by Benjamin Minge Duggar (1911)
"imbibition phenomena. — Organic bodies of the most varied nature are able to take up.water. Commonly, where this water is held within the body by ..."

4. The Physiology of Plants: A Treatise Upon the Metabolism and Sources of by Wilhelm Pfeffer (1900)
"The Force of imbibition, and the Swelling of Organized Bodies. IN order that the different vital processes which characterize the living organism may be ..."

5. A Manual of Physiology: With Practical Exercises by George Neil Stewart (1918)
"The entrance of water into a piece of gelatin, or an epidermic seale, is an example of molecular imbibition. Most animal and vegetable tissues possess this ..."

6. Lectures on the Physical Phenomena of Living Beings by Carlo Matteucci, Jonathan Pereira (1847)
"imbibition, phenomena of; differs for different liquids and at different ... Hales's experiments on the imbibition of plants; his results due to atmospheric ..."

7. A Text Book of the Principles of Physics by Alfred Daniell (1885)
"imbibition. — Porous objects, such as a lump of sugar, blotting paper, a heap of sand, a sponge, a lamp-wick, absorb liquids with a rapidity which depends ..."

8. The London Medical Gazette (1828)
"In this case, imbibition always occurs, but there is no longer any transmission of the poison to the heart. ulcerated surface, which is very moist and often ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Imbibition

Search for Imbibition on Dictionary.com!Search for Imbibition on Thesaurus.com!Search for Imbibition on Google!Search for Imbibition on Wikipedia!

Search