Definition of Intromission

1. Noun. The act of putting one thing into another.




Definition of Intromission

1. n. The act of sending in or of putting in; insertion.

Definition of Intromission

1. Noun. the state of being allowed to enter; admittance ¹

2. Noun. the act of allowing to enter; admission ¹

3. Noun. putting one thing into another; insertion ¹

4. Noun. copulation ¹

5. Noun. (legal Scotland) An intermeddling with the affairs of another, either on legal grounds or without authority. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Intromission

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Intromission

1. The insertion or introduction of one part into another. Origin: intro-+ L. Mitto, to send (05 Mar 2000)

Intromission Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Intromission

introit
introits
introitus canalis
introitus of facial canal
introitus vaginæ
introject
introjected
introjecting
introjection
introjections
introjects
introld
intromission (current term)
intromissions
intromit
intromits
intromitted
intromittent
intromitter
intromitters
intromitting
intron
intron splicing
intronic
intronization
intronless

Literary usage of Intromission

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. An Institute of the Law of Scotland: In Four Books : in the Order of Sir by John Erskine, George Mackenzie, James Ivory (1828)
"intromission cannot be ... estate of the deceased, or ceased to be such before the intromission. Thus, if the deceased died a rebel at the horn, ..."

2. A Digest of the Law of Scotland: With Special Reference to the Office and by Hugh Barclay, Scotland (1855)
"Modern practice has greatly modified the rigour of the ancient law, so that intromission in good faith will save from further liability than the extent of ..."

3. The Scottish Jurist: Containing Reports of Cases Decided in the House of by Great Britain Parliament. House of Lords, House of Lords, Parliament, Great Britain (1832)
"But he produced these characters as forming a colourable title of intromission. So there were no termini habiles for subjecting him, while the other tutors, ..."

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