Definition of Jaundice

1. Noun. Yellowing of the skin and the whites of the eyes caused by an accumulation of bile pigment (bilirubin) in the blood; can be a symptom of gallstones or liver infection or anemia.

Exact synonyms: Icterus
Generic synonyms: Symptom
Terms within: Hyperbilirubinemia
Specialized synonyms: Icterus Neonatorum, Jaundice Of The Newborn, Physiological Jaundice Of The Newborn, Kernicterus
Derivative terms: Icteric



2. Verb. Distort adversely. "Jealousy had jaundiced his judgment"
Generic synonyms: Deform, Distort, Strain

3. Noun. A rough and bitter manner.
Exact synonyms: Acerbity, Acrimony, Bitterness, Tartness, Thorniness
Generic synonyms: Disagreeableness
Derivative terms: Acerbate, Acerbic, Acrimonious, Bitter, Bitter, Tart

4. Verb. Affect with, or as if with, jaundice.
Generic synonyms: Affect

Definition of Jaundice

1. n. A morbid condition, characterized by yellowness of the eyes, skin, and urine, whiteness of the fæces, constipation, uneasiness in the region of the stomach, loss of appetite, and general languor and lassitude. It is caused usually by obstruction of the biliary passages and consequent damming up, in the liver, of the bile, which is then absorbed into the blood.

2. v. t. To affect with jaundice; to color by prejudice or envy; to prejudice.

Definition of Jaundice

1. Noun. (pathology) A morbid condition, characterized by yellowness of the eyes, skin, and urine, whiteness of the feces, constipation, queasiness, loss of appetite, and general languor and lassitude. It is caused usually by obstruction of the biliary passages and consequent damming up, in the liver, of the bile, which is then absorbed into the blood. Other causes include increased hemolysis and any liver disease. The discoloration is caused by accumulation of bilirubin in the body; bilirubin is normally excreted in bile to give feces their normal yellow-brown coloration. ¹

2. Verb. (transitive) To affect with jaundice; to color by prejudice or envy; to prejudice. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Jaundice

1. to prejudice unfavorably [v -DICED, -DICING, -DICES]

Medical Definition of Jaundice

1. Yellowing of the skin (and whites of eyes) by bilirubin, a bile pigment. Frequently because of a liver problem. This entry appears with permission from the Dictionary of Cell and Molecular Biology (11 Mar 2008)

Jaundice Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Jaundice

jatos
jatropha
jatrophas
jatrophic
jatrorrhizine
jats
jau gok
jauk
jauked
jauking
jauks
jaunce
jaunced
jaunces
jauncing
jaundice (current term)
jaundice of the newborn
jaundice root
jaundiced
jaundices
jaundicing
jaunse
jaunsed
jaunses
jaunsing
jaunt
jaunted
jauntee
jaunter
jaunters

Literary usage of Jaundice

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Principles and Practice of Medicine: Designed for the Use of by William Osler, Thomas McCrae (1916)
"The toxic jaundice cases are essentially obstructive in origin, and it is doubtful ... The manner in which the jaundice is produced in these cases has been ..."

2. The American Journal of the Medical Sciences by Southern Society for Clinical Investigation (U.S.) (1919)
"UNTIL a few years ago there was little published in regard to this type of chronic jaundice. In 1910 there was shown at the University of Toronto, ..."

3. Therapeutics, Materia Medica, and Pharmacy: Including the Special by Samuel Otway Lewis Potter (1909)
"jaundice. Ammonium Chloride is a standard remedy for catarrhal jaundice (W); in doses of gr. xx every 4 hours (VVa). Ammonium Iodide, gr. j-iij every 2 or 3 ..."

4. Differential diagnosis by Richard Clarke Cabot (1912)
"After four weeks of complete jaundice one expects to find ascites, enlarged gall-bladder, or nodular liver if the jaundice be due to malignant disease. ..."

5. A Text-book of the Practice of Medicine by James Meschter Anders (1915)
"This toxic or hemolytic jaundice occurs in many infections, ... Biffis points out that acquired hemolytic jaundice is slight while the anemia is extreme. ..."

6. Pathological physiology of internal diseases by Albion Walter Hewlett (1916)
"During jaundice the hile pigmenta are usually excreted in the urine, ... In certain types of jaundice, however, particularly chronic hemolytic jaundice and ..."

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