Definition of Macerative

1. Adjective. Accompanied by or characterized by maceration. "Macerative degeneration of the liver"

Derivative terms: Macerate
Partainyms: Maceration



Macerative Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Macerative

macedoines
macedonian
macedonite
macelike
macer
maceral
macerals
macerate
macerated
macerater
maceraters
macerates
macerating
maceration
macerations
macerative (current term)
macerator
macerators
macerozyme
macerozymes
macers
maces
macfallite
mach-zender interferometer
machaca
machacas
machado-joseph disease
machaeridian
machaeridians
machair

Literary usage of Macerative

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The British and Foreign Medico-chirurgical Review, Or, Quarterly Journal of (1860)
"... and he has therefore applied to it the term dysenteric maceration, or macerative dysentery. The following tabular analysis of ..."

2. A Practical treatise on diseases of the skin: For the Use of Students and by James Nevins Hyde, Frank Hugh Montgomery (1897)
"When the eruption is generalized and an excessive macerative effect is desired, an undershirt and drawers, made of soft rubber cloth, may be worn by the ..."

3. A Practical treatise on diseases of the skin: For the Use of Students and by Oliver Samuel Ormsby (1915)
"The macerative effect they produce is not always desirable. They possess some value in severe general pruritus, in ichthyosis, and in keratosis pilaris. ..."

4. Punch by Mark Lemon, Henry Mayhew, Tom Taylor, Shirley Brooks, Francis Cowley Burnand, Owen Seaman (1850)
"Also his macerative ELIXIR, or ASCETIC SOLUTION, for the ATTENUATION of the FRAME, warranted to reduce the stoutest proportions to the most interesting ..."

5. Journal of Morphology by Wistar Institute of Anatomy and Biology (1908)
"... and in a measure the extreme degree of dissociation may be due, in part at least, to the macerative influence of the weak alcohol. ..."

6. Manual of Antenatal Pathology and Hygiene: The Foetus by John William Ballantyne (1902)
"... a medium which specially favours the occurrence of the macerative changes which are the pathological expression of fœtal death. Maceration, then, is the ..."

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