Definition of Malefactor

1. Noun. Someone who has committed a crime or has been legally convicted of a crime.




Definition of Malefactor

1. n. An evil doer; one who commits a crime; one subject to public prosecution and punishment; a criminal.

Definition of Malefactor

1. Noun. A criminal or felon. ¹

2. Noun. An evildoer. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Malefactor

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Malefactor

1. 1. An evil doer; one who commits a crime; one subject to public prosecution and punishment; a criminal. 2. One who does wrong by injuring another, although not a criminal. Synonym: Evil doer, criminal, culprit, felon, convict. Origin: L, fr. Malefacere to do evil; male ill, evil + facere to do. See Malice, and Fact. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Malefactor Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Malefactor

maledicta
maledicta balloon
maledicta balloons
maledicted
maledicting
malediction
maledictions
maledictory
maledicts
maledight
maledights
maleevite
malefaction
malefactions
malefactor (current term)
malefactors
malefactour
malefactours
malefactress
malefactresses
malefeasance
malefeasances
malefic
malefice
maleficence
maleficences
maleficent
malefices
maleficial

Literary usage of Malefactor

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Church History of Britain, from the Birth of Jesus Christ Until the Year by Thomas Fuller, James Nichols (1842)
"But would he had spared his benefaction to the church of Wells, on condition he had been no malefactor to the church of England; yea, to religion and ..."

2. Appletons' Annual Cyclopædia and Register of Important Events of the Year (1903)
"... evil conduct of those who urge him on, not in any failure by others or by the state to do justice to him or his. He is a malefactor and nothing else. ..."

3. The Annals of Roger de Hoveden: Comprising the History of England and of by Roger of Hoveden, Roger, Henry Thomas Riley (1853)
"... if he could, and of the escape of the said malefactor. ... were to make good the loss out of the property of the malefactor so far as it would go, ..."

4. A Dictionary of the English Language: In which the Words are Deduced from ...by Samuel Johnson by Samuel Johnson (1805)
"... generally a worse malefactor than the criminal ». A term- ot reproach, either serious or ludicrous. ..."

5. The Annual Register, Or, A View of the History, Politics, and Literature for by Edmund Burke, Benjamin Franklin Collection (Library of Congress), John Davis Batchelder Collection (Library of Congress) (1822)
"... Sir, and do bring in here before your honour a notorious benefactor. " Angela.—Benefactor ! What benefactor is he ? Is he not a malefactor. ..."

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