Definition of Mandrake

1. Noun. The root of the mandrake plant; used medicinally or as a narcotic.

Exact synonyms: Mandrake Root
Group relationships: Devil's Apples, Mandragora Officinarum
Generic synonyms: Root



2. Noun. A plant of southern Europe and North Africa having purple flowers, yellow fruits and a forked root formerly thought to have magical powers.
Exact synonyms: Devil's Apples, Mandragora Officinarum
Generic synonyms: Herb, Herbaceous Plant
Group relationships: Genus Mandragora, Mandragora
Terms within: Mandrake Root

Definition of Mandrake

1. n. A low plant (Mandragora officinarum) of the Nightshade family, having a fleshy root, often forked, and supposed to resemble a man. It was therefore supposed to have animal life, and to cry out when pulled up. All parts of the plant are strongly narcotic. It is found in the Mediterranean region.

Definition of Mandrake

1. Noun. (mythology) A mandragora, a kind of tiny demon immune to fire. ¹

2. Noun. (botany) Any plant of the genus ''Mandragora'', certain of which are said to have medicinal properties; the curiously shaped root of these plants has been likened to the shape of a little man, and thus, has attained some mythic significance. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Mandrake

1. a European herb [n -S]

Medical Definition of Mandrake

1. 1. A low plant (Mandragora officinarum) of the Nightshade family, having a fleshy root, often forked, and supposed to resemble a man. It was therefore supposed to have animal life, and to cry out when pulled up. All parts of the plant are strongly narcotic. It is found in the Mediterranean region. "And shrieks like mandrakes, torn out of the earth, That living mortals, hearing them, run mad." (Shak) The mandrake of Scripture was perhaps the same plant, but proof is wanting. 2. The May apple (Podophyllum peltatum). See May apple under May, and Podophyllum. Origin: AS. Mandragora, L. Mandragoras, fr. Gr., cf. F. Mandragore. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Mandrake Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Mandrake Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Mandrake

mandolinlike
mandolins
mandom
mandoms
mandopop
mandor
mandora
mandoras
mandore
mandorla
mandorlas
mandragora
mandragoras
mandragorite
mandragorites
mandrake (current term)
mandrake root
mandrakes
mandraulic
mandred
mandrel
mandrels
mandril
mandrill
mandrills
mandrils
mandrin
mandritta
mandrittas
manduca

Literary usage of Mandrake

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A Glossary: Or, Collection of Words, Phrases, Names, and Allusions to by Robert Nares, James Orchard Halliwell-Phillipps, Thomas Wright (1872)
"St. Its soporific qualities are noticed under this name as well as the other : I drank of poppy, and cold mandrake juice, And being asleep, ..."

2. The American Antiquarian and Oriental Journal by Stephen Denison Peet (1901)
"Notwithstanding the vast literature of the mandrake, curiously few folklore ... Botanically the plant of the mandrake has been described as follows: ..."

3. Dr. William Smith's Dictionary of the Bible: Comprising Its Antiquities by William Smith (1892)
"It is well known that the mandrake is far from odoriferous, the whole plant being, in European estimation at ail event!, very fetid; on this account Celsius ..."

4. The Anatomy of Melancholy: What it Is, with All the Kinds, Causes, Symptoms by Robert Burton (1847)
"... nymphéa, lettuce, roses, purs- Simples < lane, henbane, mandrake, night- Com- . ... Oil of nymphéa, poppy, violets, roses, mandrake, nutmegs. ..."

5. The New American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge by George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana (1861)
"The qualities of the mandrake are aero-narcotic, purgative, and aphrodisiac. ... is sometimes called mandrake, but is in no way related to the mandrake of ..."

6. The American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge by George Ripley, Charles Anderson Dana (1883)
"The qualities* of the mandrake are aero-narcotic, purgative, and aphrodisiac. ... The mandrake of the Old Testament (Gen. xxx. and Canticles vii. ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Mandrake

Search for Mandrake on Dictionary.com!Search for Mandrake on Thesaurus.com!Search for Mandrake on Google!Search for Mandrake on Wikipedia!

Search

Translations