Definition of Mistress

1. Noun. An adulterous woman; a woman who has an ongoing extramarital sexual relationship with a man.

Exact synonyms: Fancy Woman, Kept Woman
Generic synonyms: Lover, Adult Female, Woman
Specialized synonyms: Concubine, Courtesan, Doxy, Paramour
Specialized synonyms: Braun, Eva Braun, Delilah

2. Noun. A woman schoolteacher (especially one regarded as strict).

3. Noun. A woman master who directs the work of others.
Specialized synonyms: Chatelaine
Generic synonyms: Employer

Definition of Mistress

1. n. A woman having power, authority, or ownership; a woman who exercises authority, is chief, etc.; the female head of a family, a school, etc.

2. v. i. To wait upon a mistress; to be courting.

Definition of Mistress

1. Noun. (archaic) Used as the title of a married woman before her name. Now used only in the abbreviated form '''Mrs'''. ¹

2. Noun. a woman, specifically one with control, authority or ownership ¹

3. Noun. a female teacher ¹

4. Noun. a female partner in an extramarital relationship, generally including sexual relations. ¹

5. Noun. a dominatrix ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Mistress

1. a woman in a position of authority [n -ES]

Medical Definition of Mistress

1. 1. A woman having power, authority, or ownership; a woman who exercises authority, is chief, etc.; the female head of a family, a school, etc. "The late queen's gentlewoman! a knight's daughter! To be her mistress' mistress!" (Shak) 2. A woman well skilled in anything, or having the mastery over it. "A letter desires all young wives to make themselves mistresses of Wingate's Arithmetic." (Addison) 3. A woman regarded with love and devotion; she who has command over one's heart; a beloved object; a sweetheart. 4. A woman filling the place, but without the rights, of a wife; a concubine; a loose woman with whom one consorts habitually. 5. A title of courtesy formerly prefixed to the name of a woman, married or unmarried, but now superseded by the contracted forms, Mrs, for a married, and Miss, for an unmarried, woman. "Now Mistress Gilpin (careful soul)." (Cowper) 6. A married woman; a wife. "Several of the neighboring mistresses had assembled to witness the event of this memorable evening." (Sir W. Scott) 7. The old name of the jack at bowls. To be one's own mistress, to be exempt from control by another person. Origin: OE. Maistress, OF. Maistresse, F. Maitresse, LL. Magistrissa, for L. Magistra, fem. Of magister. See Master, Mister, and cf. Miss a young woman. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Mistress Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Mistress

mistransliterated
mistransliterates
mistransliterating
mistransliteration
mistransliterations
mistreading
mistreadings
mistreat
mistreated
mistreater
mistreaters
mistreating
mistreatment
mistreatments
mistreats
mistresse
mistresses
mistressless
mistressship
mistressships
mistrial
mistrials
mistris
mistrist
mistrow
mistrowed
mistrowing
mistrows
mistrust

Literary usage of Mistress

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The deeper wrong; or, Incidents in the life of a slave girl, written by by Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Brent] [Jacobs (1862)
"One day, when his father and his mistress both happened ... He finally concluded to go to his mistress. When my father reproved him for it, he said, ..."

2. Representative American Plays by Arthur Hobson Quinn (1917)
"'T is true, mistress; but if there were more like your brother in the parish, ... mistress DODGE. And to think that she should actually shoe horses herself! ..."

3. The Spectator by Joseph Addison, Richard Steele (1830)
"That devotion to his mistress kindles in his mind a general tenderness, which exerts itself towards every object as well as his fair one. ..."

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