Definition of Modulus

1. Noun. An integer that can be divided without remainder into the difference between two other integers. "2 is a modulus of 5 and 9"

Generic synonyms: Integer, Whole Number



2. Noun. The absolute value of a complex number.
Generic synonyms: Absolute Value, Numerical Value

3. Noun. (physics) a coefficient that expresses how much of a specified property is possessed by a specified substance.
Category relationships: Natural Philosophy, Physics
Generic synonyms: Coefficient
Specialized synonyms: Coefficient Of Elasticity, Elastic Modulus, Modulus Of Elasticity

Definition of Modulus

1. n. A quantity or coefficient, or constant, which expresses the measure of some specified force, property, or quality, as of elasticity, strength, efficiency, etc.; a parameter.

Definition of Modulus

1. Noun. (mathematics) The base with respect to which a congruence is computed. ¹

2. Noun. (mathematics) The absolute value of a complex number. ¹

3. Noun. (physics) A coefficient that expresses how much of a certain property is possessed by a certain substance. ¹

4. Noun. (computing programming) An operator placed between two numbers, to get the remainder of the division of those numbers. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Modulus

1. a number that produces the same remainder when divided into each of two numbers [n -LI]

Medical Definition of Modulus

1. Origin: L, a small measure. See Module. A quantity or coefficient, or constant, which expresses the measure of some specified force, property, or quality, as of elasticity, strength, efficiency, etc.; a parameter. Modulus of a machine, a formula expressing the work which a given machine can perform under the conditions involved in its construction; the relation between the work done upon a machine by the moving power, and that yielded at the working points, either constantly, if its motion be uniform, or in the interval of time which it occupies in passing from any given velocity to the same velocity again, if its motion be variable; called also the efficiency of the machine. Modulus of a system of logarithms, a number by which all the Napierian logarithms must be multiplied to obtain the logarithms in another system. Modulus of elasticity. The measure of the elastic force of any substance, expressed by the ratio of a stress on a given unit of the substance to the accompanying distortion, or strain. An expression of the force (usually in terms of the height in feet or weight in pounds of a column of the same body) which would be necessary to elongate a prismatic body of a transverse section equal to a given unit, as a square inch or foot, to double, or to compress it to half, its original length, were that degree of elongation or compression possible, or within the limits of elasticity; called also Young's modulus. Modulus of rupture, the measure of the force necessary to break a given substance across, as a beam, expressed by eighteen times the load which is required to break a bar of one inch square, supported flatwise at two points one foot apart, and loaded in the middle between the points of support. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Modulus Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Modulus

modulates
modulating
modulation
modulation transfer function
modulational
modulations
modulator
modulators
modulatory
module
modules
moduli
modulini
modulino
modulo
modulus (current term)
modulus of elasticity
modulus of rigidity
modus
modus operandi
modus operandum
modus operandus
modus ponens
modus tollens
modus vivendi
mody
moe
moegoe
moegoes
moel

Literary usage of Modulus

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Smithsonian Physical Tables by Smithsonian Institution, Thomas Gray (1896)
"The Young's modulus of elasticity is used in connection with elongated bare ... In the case of an Isotropie substance the Young's modulus is related to the ..."

2. Catalogue of Scientific Papers, 1800-1900: Subject Indexby Royal Society (Great Britain), Herbert McLeod by Royal Society (Great Britain), Herbert McLeod (1908)
"reduced with respect to prime modulus. Pellet, AE Par. ... Integral functions irreducible with respect to a prime modulus, when degree is equal to modulus. ..."

3. Mathematical and Physical Papers: Collected from Different Scientific by Baron William Thomson Kelvin, Sir Joseph Larmor, James Prescott Joule (1890)
"The amount of the augmentation of period due to diminution of the Young's modulus must therefore be 1T6 x 10~6. The proportionate diminution of the Young's ..."

4. Structural Engineers' Handbook: Data for the Design and Construction of by Milo Smith Ketchum (1918)
"modulus of Elasticity.—The modulus of elasticity of a material is the constant, ... The modulus of elasticity may be defined as that force, were Hooke's law ..."

5. Laboratory Physics: A Students Manual for Colleges and Scientific Schools by Dayton Clarence Miller (1903)
"YOUNG'S modulus BY STRETCHING (a) Determine the modulus of elasticity and the elastic limit of a short iron wire. (b) Determine the modulus of elasticity of ..."

6. Structural Engineers' Handbook: Data for the Design and Construction of by Milo Smith Ketchum (1914)
"modulus of Elasticity.—The modulus of elasticity of a material is the constant, which with the elastic limit expresses the ratio between the unit stress and ..."

7. Algebra: An Elementary Text Book for the Higher Classes of Secondary Schools by George Chrystal (1889)
"If m be any positive integer whatever, which we call &t modulus, two integers, M and N, which have the same remit/fa when divided by m are said to be ..."

8. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"Remark that for air the static " length-modulus of compression " at constant temperature is the same as «hat is often technically called the " height of the ..."

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