Definition of Movement

1. Noun. A change of position that does not entail a change of location. "Gastrointestinal motility"




2. Noun. The act of changing location from one place to another. "His move put him directly in my path"

3. Noun. A natural event that involves a change in the position or location of something.

4. Noun. A group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals. "He led the national liberation front"

5. Noun. A major self-contained part of a symphony or sonata. "The second movement is slow and melodic"
Generic synonyms: Composition, Musical Composition, Opus, Piece, Piece Of Music
Specialized synonyms: Intermezzo, Scherzo
Group relationships: Sonata

6. Noun. A series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end. "Contributed to the war effort"

7. Noun. An optical illusion of motion produced by viewing a rapid succession of still pictures of a moving object. "The succession of flashing lights gave an illusion of movement"
Exact synonyms: Apparent Motion, Apparent Movement, Motion
Generic synonyms: Optical Illusion

8. Noun. A euphemism for defecation. "He had a bowel movement"
Exact synonyms: Bm, Bowel Movement
Language type: Euphemism
Generic synonyms: Defecation, Laxation, Shitting

9. Noun. A general tendency to change (as of opinion). "A broad movement of the electorate to the right"
Exact synonyms: Drift, Trend
Generic synonyms: Disposition, Inclination, Tendency
Specialized synonyms: Evolutionary Trend, Gravitation
Derivative terms: Drift, Drive

10. Noun. The driving and regulating parts of a mechanism (as of a watch or clock). "It was an expensive watch with a diamond movement"
Generic synonyms: Action, Action Mechanism
Group relationships: Clock, Ticker, Watch

11. Noun. The act of changing the location of something. "The movement of cargo onto the vessel"

Definition of Movement

1. n. The act of moving; change of place or posture; transference, by any means, from one situation to another; natural or appropriate motion; progress; advancement; as, the movement of an army in marching or maneuvering; the movement of a wheel or a machine; the party of movement.

Definition of Movement

1. Noun. Physical motion between points in space. ¹

2. Noun. (context: horology) For a clockwork, a clock, or a watch, a device that cuts time in equal portions. ¹

3. Noun. The impression of motion in an artwork, painting, novel etc. ¹

4. Noun. A trend in various fields or social categories, a group of people with a common ideology who try together to achieve certain general goals ¹

5. Noun. (music) A large division of a larger composition. ¹

6. Noun. (aviation) An instance of an aircraft taking off or landing. ¹

7. Noun. (baseball) The deviation of a pitch from ballistic flight. ¹

8. Noun. An act of emptying the bowels. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Movement

1. the act of moving [n -S]

Medical Definition of Movement

1. 1. The act of moving; change of place or posture; transference, by any means, from one situation to another; natural or appropriate motion; progress; advancement; as, the movement of an army in marching or manoeuvreing; the movement of a wheel or a machine; the party of movement. 2. Motion of the mind or feelings; emotion. 3. Manner or style of moving; as, a slow, or quick, or sudden, movement. 4. The rhythmical progression, pace, and tempo of a piece. "Any change of time is a change of movement." . One of the several strains or pieces, each complete in itself, with its own time and rhythm, which make up a larger work; as, the several movements of a suite or a symphony. 5. A system of mechanism for transmitting motion of a definite character, or for transforming motion; as, the wheelwork of a watch. Febrille movement See Kinesiatrics. Movement of the bowels, an evacuation or stool; a passage or discharge. Synonym: Motion. Movement, Motion. Motion expresses a general idea of not being at rest; movement is oftener used to express a definite, regulated motion, especially. A progress. Origin: F. Mouvement. See Move, and cf. Moment. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Movement Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Movement

move the yardsticks
move through the gears
move up
moveable
moveable feast
moveables
moveably
moved
moved(p)
moved the yardsticks
moveless
movelessly
movelessness
movelessnesses
movely
movement (current term)
movement-related pain
movements
movent
mover
mover and shaker
movers
moves
moves the yardsticks
movest
moveth
movie
movie actor
movie camera
movie film

Literary usage of Movement

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1904)
"AN ARTIFICIAL ROOT FOR INDUCING CAPILLARY movement OF SOIL MOISTURE. THE rate at which a plant is able to secure water from a soil, under any given ..."

2. Monographic Medicine by William Robie Patten Emerson, Guido Guerrini, William Brown, Wendell Christopher Phillips, John Whitridge Williams, John Appleton Swett, Hans Günther, Mario Mariotti, Hugh Grant Rowell (1916)
"paralysis in the apraxic extremity; (2) distortions of movement in the apraxic part; and (3) confusions of movement, an entirely different act being ..."

3. My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass (1857)
"A GRAND movement on the part of mankind, in any direction, ... I take the anti-slavery movement to be such an one, and a movement as sublime and glorious in ..."

4. The American Journal of Psychology by Edward Bradford ( Titchener, Granville Stanley Hall (1922)
""Three discrete touches, one central, two peripheral. One of the peripheral was like the central, the other was sharper. . No movement of any kind. ..."

5. The American Historical Review by American Historical Association (1905)
"THE FIRST STAGE OF THE movement FOR THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS IT is but a truism that the greatest value of history lies in the lesson, intellectual and moral ..."

6. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1899)
"In order to obviate some of these difficulties, another movement has been ... In strictness, however, it is not a forearm movement, but a movement of the ..."

7. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1919)
"The movement has been recognized by most of the churches. In the first stages of its ... These conventions have discussed more than the missionary movement. ..."

8. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1904)
"AN ARTIFICIAL ROOT FOR INDUCING CAPILLARY movement OF SOIL MOISTURE. THE rate at which a plant is able to secure water from a soil, under any given ..."

9. Monographic Medicine by William Robie Patten Emerson, Guido Guerrini, William Brown, Wendell Christopher Phillips, John Whitridge Williams, John Appleton Swett, Hans Günther, Mario Mariotti, Hugh Grant Rowell (1916)
"paralysis in the apraxic extremity; (2) distortions of movement in the apraxic part; and (3) confusions of movement, an entirely different act being ..."

10. My Bondage and My Freedom by Frederick Douglass (1857)
"A GRAND movement on the part of mankind, in any direction, ... I take the anti-slavery movement to be such an one, and a movement as sublime and glorious in ..."

11. The American Journal of Psychology by Edward Bradford ( Titchener, Granville Stanley Hall (1922)
""Three discrete touches, one central, two peripheral. One of the peripheral was like the central, the other was sharper. . No movement of any kind. ..."

12. The American Historical Review by American Historical Association (1905)
"THE FIRST STAGE OF THE movement FOR THE ANNEXATION OF TEXAS IT is but a truism that the greatest value of history lies in the lesson, intellectual and moral ..."

13. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1899)
"In order to obviate some of these difficulties, another movement has been ... In strictness, however, it is not a forearm movement, but a movement of the ..."

14. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1919)
"The movement has been recognized by most of the churches. In the first stages of its ... These conventions have discussed more than the missionary movement. ..."

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