Definition of Origin

1. Noun. The place where something begins, where it springs into being. "Communism's Russian root"




2. Noun. Properties attributable to your ancestry. "He comes from good origins"
Exact synonyms: Descent, Extraction
Generic synonyms: Ancestry, Derivation, Filiation, Lineage
Specialized synonyms: Full Blood

3. Noun. An event that is a beginning; a first part or stage of subsequent events.
Exact synonyms: Inception, Origination
Generic synonyms: Beginning
Specialized synonyms: Germination, Cause, Overture, Preliminary, Prelude, Emanation, Procession, Rise
Derivative terms: Originate, Originate, Originate, Originate, Originate

4. Noun. The point of intersection of coordinate axes; where the values of the coordinates are all zero.
Generic synonyms: Intersection

5. Noun. The source of something's existence or from which it derives or is derived. "Origin in sensation"
Generic synonyms: Source

6. Noun. The descendants of one individual. "His entire lineage has been warriors"

Definition of Origin

1. n. The first existence or beginning of anything; the birth.

Definition of Origin

1. Noun. The beginning of something. ¹

2. Noun. The source of a river, information, goods, etc. ¹

3. Noun. (mathematics) The point at which the axes of a coordinate system intersect ¹

4. Noun. (anatomy) The proximal end of attachment of a muscle to a bone that will not be moved by the action of that muscle. ¹

5. Noun. (cartography) an arbitrary point on the earth's surface, chosen as the zero for a system of coordinates. ¹

6. Noun. (in the plural) ancestry ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Origin

1. a coming into being [n -S]

Medical Definition of Origin

1. 1. The first existence or beginning of anything; the birth. "This mixed system of opinion and sentiment had its origin in the ancient chivalry." (Burke) 2. That from which anything primarily proceeds; the fountain; the spring; the cause; the occasion. 3. The point of attachment or end of a muscle which is fixed during contraction; in contradistinction to insertion. Origin of coordinate axes, the point where the axes intersect. See Note under Ordinate. Synonym: Commencement, rise, source, spring, fountain, derivation, cause, root, foundation. Origin, Source. Origin denotes the rise or commencement of a thing; source presents itself under the image of a fountain flowing forth in a continuous stream of influences. The origin of moral evil has been much disputed, but no one can doubt that it is the source of most of the calamities of our race. "I think he would have set out just as he did, with the origin of ideas the proper starting point of a grammarian, who is to treat of their signs." (Tooke) "Famous Greece, That source of art and cultivated thought Which they to Rome, and Romans hither, brought." (Waller) Origin: F. Origine, L. Origo, -iginis, fr. Oriri to rise, become visible; akin to Gr. To stir up, rouse, Skr. R, and perh. To E. Run. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Origin Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Origin

oriflammes
origami
origamic
origamic architecture
origamilike
origamis
origamist
origamists
origane
origanes
origans
origanums
origin (current term)
origin of replication
originable
original
original aspect ratio
original research
original sin
originalism
originalist
originalists
originalities
originality
originally
originalness
originals

Literary usage of Origin

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Life and Writings of Thomas Paine by Thomas Paine, Daniel Edwin Wheeler (1908)
"CHAPTER II OF THE origin OF THE PRESENT OLD GOVERNMENTS IT is impossible that such governments as have hitherto existed in the world, could have commenced ..."

2. Proceedings by American Pomological Society (1900)
"New Varieties: Among the most promising are: Apples—Hamilton*, color, red; quality 9; Season, September; use dessert, market, kitchen; origin Texas. ..."

3. Democracy in America by Alexis de Tocqueville, Henry Reeve (1900)
"CHAPTER II origin OF THE ANGLO-AMERICANS, AND ITS IMPORTANCE IN RELATION TO THEIR FUTURE CONDITION Utility of knowing the origin of nations in order to ..."

4. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1899)
"the front cams elevates the balls, whereas a rise of the rear cams depresses them, the two component waves will meet in the same phase at the origin when ..."

5. The Nation: The Foundations of Civil Order and Political Life in the United by Elisha Mulford (1875)
"THE origin OF THE NATION AS DEFINED IN THEORIES. THE conception of the origin of the nation is necessarily presumed in the conception of its unity and its ..."

6. Nature by Norman Lockyer (1878)
"THE origin OF A LIMESTONE ROCK1 IN N wember, 184.5, I laid before the Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester my memoir " On some Microscopic ..."

7. The Genuine Works of Hippocrates by Hippocrates (1849)
"SECTION I. ON THE origin OF GRECIAN MEDICINE, WITH A SKETCH OF THE LIFE OF HIPPOCRATES. IT is well known that the oldest documents which we possess relative ..."

8. The Greek Theater and Its Drama by Roy Caston Flickinger (1922)
"Some day a benefactor of his kind may prove beyond cavil that the problem of the origin of tragedy is as incapable of solution as is that of squaring the ..."

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