Definition of Parodic

1. a. Having the character of parody.



Definition of Parodic

1. Adjective. Of, related to, or having the characteristics of parody. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Parodic

1. comically imitative [adj]

Parodic Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Parodic Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Parodic

parochial vicar
parochialism
parochialisms
parochialities
parochiality
parochialize
parochialized
parochializes
parochializing
parochially
parochian
parochians
parochin
parochins
parodiable
parodic (current term)
parodical
parodically
parodied
parodies
parodist
parodistic
parodists
parodoi
parodontitis
parodontium
parodos
parody
parodying
parodynia

Literary usage of Parodic

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Classical Philology by University of Chicago press, JSTOR (Organization) (1917)
"Other parodic references by Plautus to contemporary Latin writers I shall discuss in a forthcoming paper. 1 In passing I note that the subjunctive seems to ..."

2. Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Volume 93 by Harvard University (1896)
"307-320 precede the first stasimon, and have therefore been regarded by Rossbach and others as falling under the parodic class. Because of the presence of ..."

3. The Oriental Tale in England in the Eighteenth Century by Martha Pike Conant (1908)
"English satire in oriental guise was chiefly social, occasionally political, rarely parodic. The reaction against the enthusiasm with which the oriental ..."

4. My Tiny Life: Crime and Passion in a Virtual World by Julian Dibbell (1998)
"... of virtual womanhood in ways my intellect seemed to have nothing to do with, in ways that bypassed all the layers of irony built into my half-parodic ..."

5. Verse Satire in England Before the Renaissance by Samuel Marion Tucker (1908)
"beast-Fables; and these will be considered in their chronological order.88 The satiric Allegory might perhaps be termed a parodic, hence a burlesque, form; ..."

6. Wit and Humor: Their Use and Abuse by William Mathews (1888)
"... has taken its place as a classic of parodic literature. It mattered not that a similar term had been applied by Carlyle, years before, to Byron's poetry ..."

Other Resources Relating to: Parodic

Search for Parodic on Dictionary.com!Search for Parodic on Thesaurus.com!Search for Parodic on Google!Search for Parodic on Wikipedia!

Search