Definition of Phenomenalism

1. n. That theory which limits positive or scientific knowledge to phenomena only, whether material or spiritual.



Definition of Phenomenalism

1. Noun. (philosophy) The doctrine that physical objects exist only as perceptual phenomena or sensory stimuli ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Phenomenalism

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Phenomenalism

1. That theory which limits positive or scientific knowledge to phenomena only, whether material or spiritual. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Phenomenalism Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Phenomenalism

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Literary usage of Phenomenalism

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the by Charles George Herbermann (1913)
"(1) The first form of phenomenalism reaches its full statement in Hume, though its logical development can be traced back through Berkeley and Locke to ..."

2. The History of European Philosophy: An Introductory Book by Walter Taylor Marvin (1917)
"This second movement included at least three important tendencies which are named respectively phenomenalism, empiricism and its resulting positivism, ..."

3. The Present Conflict of Ideals: A Study of the Philosophical Background of by Ralph Barton Perry (1918)
"I. phenomenalism This reply to naturalism commonly takes as its point of departure a view to which I shall give the name of "phenomenalism. ..."

4. The Persistent Problems of Philosophy: An Introduction to Metaphysics by Mary Whiton Calkins (1912)
"Hume, finally, though as much an idealist as ever Berkeley was, converted the spiritualistic form of idealism into phenomenalism, by conceiving of the ..."

5. Exploratio Philosophica by John Grote (1900)
"I shall now however not use this term, but the term ' phenomenalism.' I understand the two terms to express in substance the same thing, and what the thing ..."

6. The Science and Philosophy of the Organism: The Gifford Lectures Delivered by Hans Driesch (1908)
"First of all it may be not quite out of place to say a few more words on so-called " phenomenalism" as the basis of natural science. ..."

7. The Approach to Philosophy by Ralph Barton Perry (1905)
"And from the time of Berkeley these two principles, phenomenalism and ... As phenomenalism has its classic statement and proof in the writings of Berkeley, ..."

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