Definition of Pomanders

1. Noun. (plural of pomander) ¹



¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Pomanders

1. pomander [n] - See also: pomander

Pomanders Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Pomanders

pom-pom
pom-poms
pom pom
pomace
pomace fly
pomacentroid
pomaceous
pomaces
pomade
pomade acne
pomaded
pomades
pomading
pomalidomide
pomander
pomanders (current term)
pomarine
pomato
pomatoes
pomatum
pomatums
pombe
pombes
pome
pomegranate
pomegranate tree
pomegranatelike
pomegranates
pomel
pomelle

Literary usage of Pomanders

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Archaeological Journal by British Archaeological Association (1874)
"NOTES ON pomanders. By RH SODEN-SMITH, MA, PSA A FEW notes respecting the nature and use of pomanders may not be uninteresting in elucidation of the ..."

2. Gloves, Their Annals and Associations: A Chapter of Trade and Social History by S. William Beck (1883)
"pomanders of a more elaborate kind were made of filigree silver work, ... They have in physic," writes Lord •Bacon, "use of pomanders and knots of powders ..."

3. Gloves, Their Annals and Associations: A Chapter of Trade and Social History by S. William Beck (1883)
"pomanders of a more elaborate kind were made of filigree silver work, ... They have in physic," writes Lord Bacon, "use of pomanders and knots of powders ..."

4. The Book of Perfumes by Eugene Rimmel (1867)
"Drayton, in his " Queen of Cynthia," also alludes to pomanders in ... Some of these pomanders consisted in globular vessels containing strong perfume, ..."

5. Transactions of the Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club by Woolhope Naturalists' Field Club, Hereford, England, G. H. Jack (1888)
"Apples were formerly used as *' pomanders," and we have the term in Shakespeare, and in Dray ton too, as being worn '' against infectious damps; ..."

6. A Select Collection of Old English Plays by Robert ed Dodsley, William Carew Hazlitt (1874)
"See Ben Jonson's "Every Man out of his Humour," act ii. sc. 4. 3 pomanders were balls of perfume formerly worn by the higher ranks of people. ..."

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