Definition of Prones

1. prone [n] - See also: prone



Prones Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Prones

pronatores
pronators
prone
prone float
prone out
prone to
pronely
proneness
pronenesses
pronephra
pronephric
pronephroi
pronephros
pronephroses
proner
prones (current term)
pronest
proneur
proneural
proneuronal
proneurs
prong
prongbuck
prongbucks
pronged
pronghorn antelope
pronghorns
pronging
prongs

Literary usage of Prones

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Wills and Inventories from the Registry of the Archdeaconry of Richmond by James Raine, Church of England Archdeaconry of Richmond (1853)
"... ij s. vjd. iij. wast girdles of cloth, xvij dj Ib. of London sylk, xiiij s. A grose of sylke points, A quarteron of currance, viij s. In prones and ..."

2. The Old English Bible and Other Essays by Francis Aidan Gasquet (1897)
"... exhortations founded upon some Biblical passage, and prones upon the Scripture lessons proper for the special Sundays upon which they were preached. ..."

3. History of the Rise and Influence of the Spirit of Rationalism in Europe by William Edward Hartpole Lecky (1872)
"The universal practice of the Church was to place magic and sorcery among the reserved cases, and at prones, to declare magicians and sorcerers ..."

4. The Works of the English Poets, from Chaucer to Cowper: Including the Series by Alexander Chalmers, Samuel Johnson (1810)
"So to the sacred mount he takes his way, prones bis young wings, an'l tunes his infant lay, His oaten reed to rural ditties frames, To flocks and rocks, ..."

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