Definition of Pungency

1. Noun. Wit having a sharp and caustic quality. "The bite of satire"

Exact synonyms: Bite
Generic synonyms: Humor, Humour, Wit, Witticism, Wittiness
Derivative terms: Pungent



2. Noun. A strong odor or taste property. "The raciness of the wine"
Exact synonyms: Bite, Raciness, Sharpness
Generic synonyms: Spice, Spicery, Spiciness
Derivative terms: Pungent, Racy

Definition of Pungency

1. n. The quality or state of being pungent or piercing; keenness; sharpness; piquancy; as, the pungency of ammonia.

Definition of Pungency

1. Noun. The state of being pungent. ¹

2. Noun. A foul odor. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Pungency

1. the state of being pungent [n -CIES]

Pungency Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Pungency

punditries
punditry
pundits
pundle
pundles
pundonor
punese
puneses
pung
punga
pungapung
pungas
pungence
pungences
pungencies
pungency (current term)
pungent
pungently
pungies
pungle
pungled
pungles
pungling
pungs
pungwe
pungwes
pungy
punicic
punicic acid
punier

Literary usage of Pungency

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Mental Science: A Compendium of Psychology, and the History of Philosophy by Alexander Bain (1870)
"The general effect, named pungency, is a mode of nervous and mental ... There are odours that we may call acrid, combining pungency with ill smell, ..."

2. Mental Science: A Compendium of Psychology, and the History of Philosophy by Alexander Bain (1868)
"Ammonia (as in smelling salts), nicotine, mustard, acetic acid, give rise to a sharp stinging sensation, for which the best name is pungency. ..."

3. Food and Its Adulterations: Comprising the Reports of the Analytical by Arthur Hill Hassall (1855)
"Purchased in New Church-street, Edgware-road, price Is. 4d. per Ib. Adulterated—possessing but little pungency, consisting principally of wheaten flour, ..."

4. Food and Its Adulterations: Comprising the Reports of the Analytical by Arthur Hill Hassall (1855)
"Adulterated—possessing but very little pungency, and about equal to "seconds" in ... Adulterated—possessing extremely little pungency, consisting chiefly of ..."

5. Mental and Moral Science: A Compendium of Psychology and Ethics by Alexander Bain (1868)
"The general effect, named pungency, is a mode of nervous and mental ... There are odours that we may call acrid, combining pungency with ill smell, ..."

6. The Life of Lorenzo De' Medici, Called the Magnificent by William Roscoe (1803)
"Franco, the poetick correspondent of Pulci, was a canon of Florence, and was by no means inferiour to him in pungency and humour. It is to be regretted that ..."

7. The Life of Lorenzo De' Medici, Called the Magnificent by William Roscoe (1803)
"Franco, the poetick correspondent of Pulci, was a canon of Florence, and was by no means inferiour to him in pungency and humour. It is to be regretted that ..."

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