Definition of Quick

1. Noun. Any area of the body that is highly sensitive to pain (as the flesh underneath the skin or a fingernail or toenail).

Generic synonyms: Area, Region



2. Adjective. Accomplished rapidly and without delay. "He has a right to a speedy trial"
Exact synonyms: Speedy
Similar to: Fast
Derivative terms: Quickness, Speed, Speediness

3. Adverb. With little or no delay. "Come here, quick!"
Exact synonyms: Promptly, Quickly
Partainyms: Prompt

4. Adjective. Hurried and brief. "A fast visit"
Exact synonyms: Fast, Flying
Similar to: Hurried
Derivative terms: Fastness, Quickness

5. Adjective. Moving quickly and lightly. "The old dog was so spry it was halfway up the stairs before we could stop it"
Exact synonyms: Agile, Nimble, Spry
Similar to: Active
Derivative terms: Agility, Nimbleness, Quickness, Quickness

6. Adjective. Apprehending and responding with speed and sensitivity. "A ready wit"
Exact synonyms: Ready
Similar to: Intelligent
Derivative terms: Quickness, Readiness

7. Adjective. Performed with little or no delay. "A straightaway denial"
Exact synonyms: Immediate, Prompt, Straightaway
Similar to: Fast
Derivative terms: Immediateness, Promptness, Quickness

8. Adjective. Easily aroused or excited. "A warm temper"
Exact synonyms: Warm
Similar to: Excitable
Derivative terms: Quickness

Definition of Quick

1. a. Alive; living; animate; -- opposed to dead or inanimate.

2. adv. In a quick manner; quickly; promptly; rapidly; with haste; speedily; without delay; as, run quick; get back quick.

3. n. That which is quick, or alive; a living animal or plant; especially, the hawthorn, or other plants used in making a living hedge.

4. v. t. & i. To revive; to quicken; to be or become alive.

Definition of Quick

1. Adjective. Moving with speed, rapidity or swiftness, or capable of doing so; rapid; fast. ¹

2. Adjective. Occurring in a short time; happening or done rapidly. ¹

3. Adjective. Lively, fast-thinking, witty, intelligent. ¹

4. Adjective. Mentally agile, alert, perceptive. ¹

5. Adjective. Of temper: easily aroused to anger; quick-tempered. ¹

6. Adjective. (archaic) Alive, living. ¹

7. Adjective. (archaic) Pregnant, especially at the stage where the foetus's movements can be felt; figuratively, alive with some emotion or feeling. ¹

8. Adjective. Of water: flowing. ¹

9. Adjective. Burning, flammable, fiery. ¹

10. Adverb. (colloquial) to do with speed, quickly ¹

11. Noun. raw or sensitive flesh, especially that underneath finger and toe nails. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Quick

1. acting or capable of acting with speed [adj QUICKER, QUICKEST] / a sensitive area of flesh [n -S]

Medical Definition of Quick

1. 1. Alive; living; animate; opposed to dead or inanimate. "Not fully quyke, ne fully dead they were." (Chaucer) "The Lord Jesus Christ, who shall judge the quick and the dead at his appearing and his kingdom." (2 Tim. Iv. 1) "Man is no star, but a quick coal Of mortal fire." (Herbert) In this sense the word is nearly obsolete, except in some compounds, or in particular phrases. 2. Characterised by life or liveliness; animated; sprightly; agile; brisk; ready. " A quick wit." 3. Speedy; hasty; swift; not slow; as, be quick "Oft he her his charge of quick return Repeated." (Milton) 4. Impatient; passionate; hasty; eager; eager; sharp; unceremonious; as, a quick temper. "The bishop was somewhat quick with them, and signified that he was much offended." (Latimer) 5. Fresh; bracing; sharp; keen. "The air is quick there, And it pierces and sharpens the stomach." (Shak) 6. Sensitive; perceptive in a high degree; ready; as, a quick ear. "To have an open ear, a quick eye." "They say that women are so quick." (Tennyson) 7. Pregnant; with child. Quick grass. A vein of ore which is productive, not barren. Quick vinegar, vinegar made by allowing a weak solution of alcohol to trickle slowly over shavings or other porous material. Quick water, quicksilver water. Quick with child, pregnant with a living child. Synonym: Speedy, expeditious, swift, rapid, hasty, prompt, ready, active, brisk, nimble, fleet, alert, agile, lively, sprightly. Origin: As. Cwic, cwicu, cwucu, cucu, living; akin to OS. Quik, D. Kwik, OHG. Quec, chec, G. Keck bold, lively, Icel. Kvikr living, Goth. Qius, Lith. Q Quitch grass. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Quick Pictures

Click the following link to bring up a new window with an automated collection of images related to the term: Quick Images

Lexicographical Neighbors of Quick

quibbly
quiblin
quiblins
quibs
quica
quice
quich
quiche-eater
quiche Lorraine
quiche lorraine
quiched
quichelike
quiches
quiches lorraines
quiching
quick (current term)
quick-and-dirty
quick-change(a)
quick-draw
quick-eared
quick-fire
quick-freeze
quick-freezes
quick-freezing
quick-froze
quick-frozen
quick-sighted
quick-stop mutant
quick-tempered
quick-witted

Literary usage of Quick

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Pronouncing and Defining Dictionary of Music by William Smythe Babcock Mathews, Emil Liebling (1896)
"Allegro con fuoco (äl-lä'grö kön foo-ö'kö), It. quick, with tire and animation. Allegro con moltissimo moto (äl-lä'grö kön möl-tes'si-mö ..."

2. The Iliad of Homer by Homer, John Graham Cordery (1871)
"Into the other's hands the bloodstain'd spoils, Then mounted quick the steed again ; they plied The lash ... How got ye, tell me quick, these noble steeds ? ..."

3. The Volunteer's Hand Book: Containing an Abridgment of Hardee's Infantry by James Kendall Lee (1861)
"The instructor wishing the squad to inarch in quick time, will command, I. Squad, forward. 2. MARCH. § 12. At the command march, the squad will step off and ..."

4. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1918)
"M He was a soldier of quick perception and strong character, and early and boldly advocated freeing the slaves, and the enlistment of the young and ..."

5. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1918)
"He was a soldier of quick perception and strong character, and early and boldly advocated freeing the slaves, and the enlistment of the young and ..."

6. Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life by George Eliot (1873)
"It was the end of the fourth day when Mr. Vincy said to her, Mr. Vincy from his chair threw a quick glance upward at his son, who had advanced near to him, ..."

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