Definition of Sandalwood

1. Noun. Close-grained fragrant yellowish heartwood of the true sandalwood; has insect repelling properties and is used for carving and cabinetwork.

Substance meronyms: Sandalwood Tree, Santalum Album, True Sandalwood
Generic synonyms: Wood



Definition of Sandalwood

1. n. The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian tree (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and S. pyrularium, the Australian S. latifolium, etc. The name is extended to several other kinds of fragrant wood.

Definition of Sandalwood

1. Noun. Any of various tropical trees of the genus ''Santalum'', native to India, Australia, Hawaii, and many south Pacific islands. ¹

2. Noun. The aromatic heartwood of these trees used in ornamental carving, in the construction of insect-repellent boxes and chests, and as a source of certain perfumes. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sandalwood

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Sandalwood

1. Origin: F. Sandal, santal, fr. Ar. Candal, or Gr. Santalon; both ultimately fr. Skr. Candana. Cf. Sanders. The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian tree (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and S. Pyrularium, the Australian S. Latifolium, etc. The name is extended to several other kinds of fragrant wood. Any tree of the genus Santalum, or a tree which yields sandalwood. The red wood of a kind of buckthorn, used in Russia for dyeing leather (Rhamnus Dahuricus). False sandalwood, the fragrant wood of several trees not of the genus Santalum, as Ximenia Americana, Myoporum tenuifolium of Tahiti. Red sandalwood, a heavy, dark red dyewood, being the heartwood of two leguminous trees of India (Pterocarpus santalinus, and Adenanthera pavonina). Synonym: red sanderswood, sanders or saunders, and rubywood. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Sandalwood Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sandalwood

sand wasp
sand wedge
sand wedges
sand whiting
sandable
sandal
sandal foot
sandal strap dermatitis
sandaled
sandaliform
sandaling
sandalled
sandalling
sandalpunk
sandals
sandalwood (current term)
sandalwood family
sandalwood oil
sandalwood tree
sandalwoods
sandarac
sandarac tree
sandarach
sandaracs
sandbag
sandbagged
sandbagger
sandbaggers
sandbagging

Literary usage of Sandalwood

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. American Druggist (1891)
"Even now this wood is used for the same purpose in India, and the honor rendered to the dead is proportioned to the number of logs of sandalwood upon the ..."

2. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"The discovery of a sandalwood in the islands of the Pacific led to a considerable trade of a somewhat piratical nature, resulting in difficulties with the ..."

3. Between East and West: The Moluccas and the Traffic in Spices Up to the by R. A. Donkin (2003)
"The Chinese probably obtained significant amounts of sandalwood at about the same ... The names for sandalwood in South and East Asia are overwhelmingly ..."

4. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"About the vear 1810 as much as 400,00" dollars is said to have been received annually for sandalwood by Kamehameha, king of Hawaii. ..."

5. Between East and West: The Moluccas and the Traffic in Spices Up to the by R. A. Donkin (2003)
"1590), Abu'l Fazl-i-'Allami remarked that "during the present reign (of Akbar), [sandalwood] has been successfully planted in India. ..."

6. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1902)
"Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich Islands ... 8 in. Brown, with darker shades, heavy, crooked in growth. sandalwood ..."

7. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1902)
"Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich Islands ... 8 in. Brown, with darker shades, heavy, crooked in growth. sandalwood ..."

8. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1908)
"Known also as " Fragrant sandalwood." Height 30 ft. ; diam. up to 1 ft. ... Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich ..."

9. American Druggist (1891)
"Even now this wood is used for the same purpose in India, and the honor rendered to the dead is proportioned to the number of logs of sandalwood upon the ..."

10. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"The discovery of a sandalwood in the islands of the Pacific led to a considerable trade of a somewhat piratical nature, resulting in difficulties with the ..."

11. Between East and West: The Moluccas and the Traffic in Spices Up to the by R. A. Donkin (2003)
"The Chinese probably obtained significant amounts of sandalwood at about the same ... The names for sandalwood in South and East Asia are overwhelmingly ..."

12. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"About the vear 1810 as much as 400,00" dollars is said to have been received annually for sandalwood by Kamehameha, king of Hawaii. ..."

13. Between East and West: The Moluccas and the Traffic in Spices Up to the by R. A. Donkin (2003)
"1590), Abu'l Fazl-i-'Allami remarked that "during the present reign (of Akbar), [sandalwood] has been successfully planted in India. ..."

14. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1902)
"Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich Islands ... 8 in. Brown, with darker shades, heavy, crooked in growth. sandalwood ..."

15. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1902)
"Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich Islands ... 8 in. Brown, with darker shades, heavy, crooked in growth. sandalwood ..."

16. Wood: A Manual of the Natural History and Industrial Applications of the by George Simonds Boulger (1908)
"Known also as " Fragrant sandalwood." Height 30 ft. ; diam. up to 1 ft. ... Used as a substitute for sandalwood. sandalwood, Bastard, of the Sandwich ..."

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