Definition of Scrum

1. Noun. (rugby) the method of beginning play in which the forwards of each team crouch side by side with locked arms; play starts when the ball is thrown in between them and the two sides compete for possession.

Exact synonyms: Scrummage
Generic synonyms: Beginning, Commencement, Start
Category relationships: Rugby, Rugby Football, Rugger



Definition of Scrum

1. Proper noun. (software development) An iterative and incremental agile software development method for managing software projects and product or application development. ¹

2. Noun. A tightly-packed and disorderly crowd of people. ¹

3. Noun. (Canada) Specifically used in the Canadian media to describe a tightly-packed group of reporters surrounding a member of the Canadian House of Commons while in the Parliament Buildings. ¹

4. Noun. (senseid en all the forwards joined together in an organised way) (rugby) In rugby union or rugby league, all the forwards joined together in an organised way. Also known as a scrummage. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Scrum

1. to engage in a scrummage (a formation around the ball in rugby) [v SCRUMMED, SCRUMMING, SCRUMS]

Scrum Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Scrum

scruffbucket
scruffbuckets
scruffier
scruffiest
scruffily
scruffiness
scruffinesses
scruffle
scruffled
scruffles
scruffling
scruffs
scruffy
scruffy chic
scruin
scrum (current term)
scrum-half
scrum machine
scrum machines
scrumble
scrumbles
scrummage
scrummaged
scrummager
scrummagers
scrummages
scrummaging
scrummaging machine
scrummaging machines
scrummed

Literary usage of Scrum

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Philippine Journal of Science by Philippines Bureau of Science (1907)
"By Paul G. Woolley, MD Chemical Laboratory: IV. Notes on Analysis of the Water from the Manila Water Supply. By Charles L. Bliss, MS scrum Laboratory: V. ..."

2. International Catalogue of Scientific Literature by Royal Society (Great Britain) (1905)
"Path., Leipzig, 49, 1903, (307-323). [3700 3000]. 67(53 (R-10657) Hewlett, RT scrum therapy. Bacterial' therapeutics and vaccines. London (Churchill), 1903. ..."

3. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1911)
"This scrum kills the bacilli and at the same time neutralizes the toxin formed during ... Grown on scrum or agar over which sterile blood has been smeared, ..."

4. Proceedings of the American Pharmaceutical Association at the Annual Meeting by American Pharmaceutical Association, National Pharmaceutical Convention (1903)
"... scrum into the Pharmacopoeia, with suitable tests for purity, strength, etc., it may be of interest to the members to point out some of the difficulties ..."

5. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1910)
"An important point with regard to the therapeutic application of an anti-bacterial scrum, is that when the scrum is kept in vitro the complement rapidly ..."

6. St. Mary's Hospital Gazette by St. Mary's Hospital (London, England) (1904)
"Will the forwards get possession against a scrum averaging 13 stone? ... Half-way through the second half Wilson was pulled out of the scrum to assist the ..."

7. A Treatise on Apoplexy, Cerebral Hemorrhage, Cerebral Embolism, Cerebral by John A. Lidell (1873)
"A man of 58 found dead in bed; autopsy ; found the lesions belonging to serous and congestive apoplexy; copious effusion of scrum beneath the arachnoid and ..."

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