Definition of Sensation

1. Noun. An unelaborated elementary awareness of stimulation. "A sensation of touch"




2. Noun. Someone who is dazzlingly skilled in any field.
Exact synonyms: Ace, Adept, Champion, Genius, Hotshot, Maven, Mavin, Star, Superstar, Virtuoso, Whiz, Whizz, Wiz, Wizard
Generic synonyms: Expert
Specialized synonyms: Track Star
Derivative terms: Ace, Adept, Star, Virtuoso

3. Noun. A general feeling of excitement and heightened interest. "Anticipation produced in me a sensation somewhere between hope and fear"
Generic synonyms: Stir

4. Noun. A state of widespread public excitement and interest. "The news caused a sensation"

5. Noun. The faculty through which the external world is apprehended. "In the dark he had to depend on touch and on his senses of smell and hearing"

Definition of Sensation

1. n. An impression, or the consciousness of an impression, made upon the central nervous organ, through the medium of a sensory or afferent nerve or one of the organs of sense; a feeling, or state of consciousness, whether agreeable or disagreeable, produced either by an external object (stimulus), or by some change in the internal state of the body.

Definition of Sensation

1. Noun. A physical feeling or perception from something that comes into contact with the body; something sensed. ¹

2. Noun. A widespread reaction of interest or excitement. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Sensation

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Sensation

1. 1. An impression, or the consciousness of an impression, made upon the central nervous organ, through the medium of a sensory or afferent nerve or one of the organs of sense; a feeling, or state of consciousness, whether agreeable or disagreeable, produced either by an external object (stimulus), or by some change in the internal state of the body. "Perception is only a special kind of knowledge, and sensation a special kind of feeling. . . . Knowledge and feeling, perception and sensation, though always coexistent, are always in the inverse ratio of each other." (Sir W. Hamilton) 2. A purely spiritual or psychical affection; agreeable or disagreeable feelings occasioned by objects that are not corporeal or material. 3. A state of excited interest or feeling, or that which causes it. "The sensation caused by the appearance of that work is still remembered by many." (Brougham) Synonym: Perception. Sensation, Perseption. The distinction between these words, when used in mental philosophy, may be thus stated; if I simply smell a rose, I have a sensation; if I refer that smell to the external object which occasioned it, I have a perception. Thus, the former is mere feeling, without the idea of an object; the latter is the mind's apprehension of some external object as occasioning that feeling. "Sensation properly expresses that change in the state of the mind which is produced by an impression upon an organ of sense (of which change we can conceive the mind to be conscious, without any knowledge of external objects). Perception, on the other hand, expresses the knowledge or the intimations we obtain by means of our sensations concerning the qualities of matter, and consequently involves, in every instance, the notion of externality, or outness, which it is necessary to exclude in order to seize the precise import of the word sensation." . Origin: Cf. F. Sensation. See Sensate. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Sensation Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Sensation

senoritas
senors
senpai
senryu
senryus
sens
sensa
sensable
sensactor
sensactors
sensate
sensated
sensately
sensates
sensating
sensation (current term)
sensation disorders
sensation time
sensational
sensationalise
sensationalised
sensationalises
sensationalising
sensationalism
sensationalisms
sensationalist
sensationalistic
sensationalistically
sensationalists
sensationalizable

Literary usage of Sensation

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Psychology: General Introduction by Charles Hubbard Judd (1907)
"E. sensation Intensities . While it has been necessary to discuss sensation qualities in terms of the relation of these qualities to various organs of sense ..."

2. Psychology: General Introduction by Charles Hubbard Judd (1907)
"Indeed, it is in this sphere of sensation intensities that the general methods of modern experimental investigation were first most fully developed. ..."

3. Psychology: General Introduction by Charles Hubbard Judd (1907)
"E. sensation Intensities While it has been necessary to discuss sensation qualities in terms of the relation of these qualities to various organs ..."

4. The Harvard Classics by Charles William Eliot (1910)
"no sensation. My Ego has sensation; my Ego possesses the faculty of sensation.' "In the above case, Ananda, where it is said, 'sensation is my Ego,' reply ..."

5. The Principles of Psychology by William James (1890)
"And first, of the process called sensation. sensation AND PERCEPTION DISTINGUISHED. The words sensation and Perception do not carry very definitely ..."

6. The Principles of Psychology by William James (1902)
"And first, of the process called sensation. sensation AND PERCEPTION DISTINGUISHED. The words sensation and Perception do not carry very definitely ..."

7. The Principles of Psychology by William James (1890)
"And first, of the process called sensation. sensation AND PERCEPTION DISTINGUISHED. The words sensation and Perception do not carry very definitely ..."

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