Definition of Shamelessness

1. Noun. Behavior marked by a bold defiance of the proprieties and lack of shame.

Exact synonyms: Brazenness
Generic synonyms: Boldness, Daring, Hardihood, Hardiness
Derivative terms: Brazen, Shameless



Definition of Shamelessness

1. Noun. The state or characteristic of being shameless. ¹

2. Noun. (countable rare) An utterance or action which is shameless. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Shamelessness

1. [n -ES]

Shamelessness Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Shamelessness

shameable
shameably
shamed
shamefaced
shamefacedly
shamefacedness
shamefast
shamefastly
shamefastness
shameful
shamefully
shamefulness
shamefulnesses
shameless
shamelessly
shamelessness (current term)
shamelessnesses
shamelike
shamen
shamer
shamers
shames
shamest
shameth
shami kebab
shamiana
shamianas
shaming
shamingly
shamisen

Literary usage of Shamelessness

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Sermons Preached Upon Several Occasions by Robert South (1853)
"And thus much for the third thing proposed, which was to show the several degrees of shamelessness in sin. Pass we now to the 1. Because shamelessness in ..."

2. Handy-book of Literary Curiosities by William Shepard Walsh (1892)
"hypocrisy may beget open shamelessness. But the Erotic School in America, save among certain vulgar and now forgotten mercenaries who followed the lead of ..."

3. The Law in Shakespeare by Cushman Kellogg Davis (1883)
"... the fa- tuity of James I., the blinded obstinacy of Charles I., the voluptuous shamelessness of Charles II., and the ferocious bigotry of James II. No. ..."

4. The Law in Shakespeare by Cushman Kellogg Davis (1884)
"... the fatuity of James I., the blinded obstinacy of Charles I., the voluptuous shamelessness of Charles II., and the ferocious bigotry of James II. No. ..."

5. A History of Greek Philosophy from the Earliest Period to the Time of Socrates by Eduard Zeller (1881)
"of lucky and unlucky days, so widely spread in the old religions.1 Heracleitus also expresses himself strongly about the shamelessness of the Dionysiac ..."

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