Definition of Shammash

1. shammes [n -MASHIM] - See also: shammes



Shammash Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Shammash

shamelike
shamen
shamer
shamers
shames
shamest
shameth
shami kebab
shamiana
shamianas
shaming
shamingly
shamisen
shamisens
shammas
shammash (current term)
shammashim
shammasim
shammed
shammer
shammers
shammied
shammies
shamming
shammos
shammosim
shammy
shammy leather
shammying

Literary usage of Shammash

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. American Jewish Year Book by American Jewish Committee, Jewish Publication Society of America (1920)
"She reserved again a place for a Jew, M. Lazare Weiller, originally from Selestat, where his father had been shammash (beadle) of the community. ..."

2. Jewish Ceremonial Institutions and Customs by William Rosenau (1912)
"A separate taper is used for the kindling of the lights and bears the name " shammash," servant. In the Talmud there is a discussion as to whether the ..."

3. Jewish Services in Synagogue and Home by Lewis Naphtali Dembitz (1898)
"... 2), rolls up the book and returns it to the shammash, and then preaches upon what he has read. The lesson seems strangely short, but it might have been ..."

4. The Jewish Religion by Michael Friedländer (1891)
"... the two parts of the threads are bound together by a double knot; the largest thread—called shammash, " the servant "—is then wound seven, eight, ..."

5. A Day in Capernaum by Franz Delitzsch, George Henry Schodde (1892)
"... has been closed and given to the " shammash*'1 (servant of the synagogue), He delivers His address, ..."

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