Definition of Shear

1. Noun. (physics) a deformation of an object in which parallel planes remain parallel but are shifted in a direction parallel to themselves. "The shear changed the quadrilateral into a parallelogram"

Category relationships: Natural Philosophy, Physics
Generic synonyms: Deformation



2. Verb. Cut with shears. "Shear hedges"
Generic synonyms: Clip, Crop, Cut Back, Dress, Lop, Prune, Snip, Trim
Derivative terms: Shearer, Shearing, Shears

3. Noun. A large edge tool that cuts sheet metal by passing a blade through it.
Generic synonyms: Edge Tool

4. Verb. Shear the wool from. "Shear sheep"
Exact synonyms: Fleece
Generic synonyms: Shave, Trim
Derivative terms: Fleece, Fleece, Fleece, Shearer, Shearing, Shears

5. Verb. Cut or cut through with shears. "Shear the wool off the lamb"
Generic synonyms: Cut
Derivative terms: Shearer, Shearing

6. Verb. Become deformed by forces tending to produce a shearing strain.
Category relationships: Natural Philosophy, Physics
Generic synonyms: Change

Definition of Shear

1. v. t. To cut, clip, or sever anything from with shears or a like instrument; as, to shear sheep; to shear cloth.

2. n. A pair of shears; -- now always used in the plural, but formerly also in the singular. See Shears.

3. v. i. To deviate. See Sheer.

Definition of Shear

1. Verb. To cut, originally with a sword or other bladed weapon, now usually with shears, or as if using shears. ¹

2. Verb. To remove the fleece from a sheep etc by clipping ¹

3. Verb. (physics) To deform because of shearing forces ¹

4. Noun. a cutting tool similar to scissors, but often larger ¹

5. Noun. the act of shearing, or something removed by shearing ¹

6. Noun. (physics) a force that produces a shearing strain ¹

7. Adjective. (misspelling of sheer) ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Shear

1. to cut the hair or wool from [v SHEARED or SHORE, SHORN, SHEARING, SHEARS]

Medical Definition of Shear

1. 1. To cut, clip, or sever anything from with shears or a like instrument; as, to shear sheep; to shear cloth. It is especially applied to the cutting of wool from sheep or their skins, and the nap from cloth. 2. To separate or sever with shears or a similar instrument; to cut off; to clip (something) from a surface; as, to shear a fleece. "Before the golden tresses . . . Were shorn away." (Shak) 3. To reap, as grain. 4. To deprive of property; to fleece. 5. To produce a change of shape in by a shear. See Shear. Origin: Sheared or Shore; Sheared or Shorn; Shearing] [OE. Sheren, scheren, to shear, cut, shave, AS. Sceran, scieran, scyran; akin to D. & G. Scheren, Icel. Skera, Dan. Skire, Gr. Cf. Jeer, Score, Shard, Share, Sheer to turn aside. 1. A pair of shears; now always used in the plural, but formerly also in the singular. See Shears. "On his head came razor none, nor shear." (Chaucer) "Short of the wool, and naked from the shear." (Dryden) 2. A shearing; used in designating the age of sheep. "After the second shearing, he is a two-sher ram; . . . at the expiration of another year, he is a three-shear ram; the name always taking its date from the time of shearing." (Youatt) 3. An action, resulting from applied forces, which tends to cause two contiguous parts of a body to slide relatively to each other in a direction parallel to their plane of contact; also called shearing stress, and tangential stress. 4. A strain, or change of shape, of an elastic body, consisting of an extension in one direction, an equal compression in a perpendicular direction, with an unchanged magnitude in the third direction. Shear blade, one of the blades of shears or a shearing machine. Shear hulk. See Hulk. Shear steel, a steel suitable for shears, scythes, and other cutting instruments, prepared from fagots of blistered steel by repeated heating, rolling, and tilting, to increase its malleability and fineness of texture. Origin: AS. Sceara. See Shear. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Shear Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Shear

sheadings
sheaf
sheafed
sheafier
sheafiest
sheafing
sheafless
sheaflike
sheafs
sheafy
sheal
shealed
shealing
shealings
sheals
shear (current term)
shear-cake
shear-cakes
shear centre
shear fields
shear flow
shear legs
shear rate
shear strength
shear stress
shear stresses
shear wall
shear wave
shear waves
shearability

Literary usage of Shear

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, Literature and (1910)
"46) be the section at which the greatest shear is required, and let the loads advance from the left till W, is at C. .If R is the resultant of the loads ..."

2. Handbook of Building Construction: Data for Architects, Designing and by George Albert Hool, Nathan Clarke Johnson (1920)
"The "total" shear diagram is shown in Fig. 70. In steel beams the shear is assumed as ... shear Variation in Concrete Beams. — The variation of shear in a ..."

3. Handbook of Building Construction: Data for Architects, Designing and by George Albert Hool, Nathan Clarke Johnson (1920)
"The "total" shear diagram is shown in Fig. 70. In steel beams the shear is assumed as ... shear Variation in Concrete Beams. — The variation of shear in a ..."

4. Johnson's Materials of Construction by John Butler Johnson, Morton Owen Withey (1919)
"Specimens for shear Tests.—For shear tests of metals, specimens of rectangular cross-section with a breadth equal to at least four times the depth are ..."

5. Johnson's Materials of Construction by John Butler Johnson (1918)
"Specimens for shear Tests.—For shear tests of metals, specimens of rectangular cross-section with a breadth equal to at least four times the depth are ..."

6. Structural Engineers' Handbook: Data for the Design and Construction of by Milo Smith Ketchum (1914)
"The transverse loads or forces are carried by flexure, which is a combination of the three simple stresses of tension, compression and shear. ..."

7. The Loma Prieta, California, Earthquake of October 17, 1989 edited by Thomas D. O'Rourke (1993)
"The shear moduli then were evaluated, using both RC methods for small strains ... We present data for evaluating the low-amplitude shear modulus (G^) on the ..."

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