Definition of Signorinas

1. signorina [n] - See also: signorina



Signorinas Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Signorinas

signless
signmaker
signmakers
signoff
signoffs
signor
signora
signoras
signore
signores
signori
signoria
signorias
signories
signorina
signorinas (current term)
signorine
signors
signory
signout
signouts
signpost
signposted
signposting
signposts
signs
signs and symptoms
signs in
signs off
signs on

Literary usage of Signorinas

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. On the Trail of the Immigrant by Edward Alfred Steiner (1906)
"Signors and signorinas," said Pietro, after he had played all the tunes of his limited repertoire, " I have the great honour of presenting to you the ..."

2. Merchants' Magazine and Commercial Review by William B. Dana (1852)
"The Italian opera and ballet had already been naturalized among us, and all the cost and eclat of criticising feasting and marrying the signorinas had ..."

3. A Treasury of Irish Poetry in the English Tongue by Stopford Augustus Brooke, Thomas William Rolleston (1900)
"Oh ! graceful the mantillas that the signorinas wear, And tasteful are the bonnets of Parisian ladies fair, But never cloak or hood or robe, in palace, ..."

4. The Knickerbocker: Or, New-York Monthly Magazine by Charles Fenno Hoffman, Timothy Flint, Lewis Gaylord Clark, Kinahan Cornwallis, John Holmes Agnew (1844)
"... it,' and was compelled to sit with compressed lips, and listen to ' sounds from flat shrill signorinas, quavering to distraction,' for two long hours. ..."

5. The Knickerbocker; Or, New York Monthly Magazine by Charles Fenno Hoffman, Lewis Gaylord Clark, Kinahan Cornwallis, John Holmes Agnew, Timothy Flint, Washington Irving (1844)
"... it,' nnd was compelled to tit with compressed lips, and listen to ' sounds from flat shrill signorinas, quavering to distraction," for two long hours. ..."

6. The Dublin Book of Irish Verse 1728-1909 by John Cooke (1909)
"Oh ! graceful the mantillas that the signorinas wear, And tasteful are the bonnets of Parisian ladies fair, But never cloak, or hood, or robe, in palace, ..."

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