Definition of Spout

1. Noun. An opening that allows the passage of liquids or grain.

Specialized synonyms: Gargoyle, Nose, Nozzle
Generic synonyms: Opening
Group relationships: Pipage, Pipe, Piping, Watering Can, Watering Pot



2. Verb. Gush forth in a sudden stream or jet. "Water gushed forth"
Exact synonyms: Gush, Spirt, Spurt
Specialized synonyms: Pump, Blow, Whoosh
Generic synonyms: Pour
Derivative terms: Gush, Gusher, Spirt, Spouter, Spouter, Spurt

3. Verb. Talk in a noisy, excited, or declamatory manner. "Sam and Sue spout over the results of the experiment"
Exact synonyms: Jabber, Mouth Off, Rabbit On, Rant, Rave
Generic synonyms: Mouth, Speak, Talk, Utter, Verbalise, Verbalize
Derivative terms: Jabber, Jabberer, Jabbering, Rant, Rant, Ranter, Ranting, Raver, Raving, Spouter

Definition of Spout

1. v. t. To throw out forcibly and abudantly, as liquids through an office or a pipe; to eject in a jet; as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk.

2. v. i. To issue with with violence, or in a jet, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout; as, water spouts from a hole; blood spouts from an artery.

3. n. That through which anything spouts; a discharging lip, pipe, or orifice; a tube, pipe, or conductor of any kind through which a liquid is poured, or by which it is conveyed in a stream from one place to another; as, the spout of a teapot; a spout for conducting water from the roof of a building.

Definition of Spout

1. Noun. a tube or lip through which liquid is poured or discharged ¹

2. Noun. a stream of liquid ¹

3. Noun. the mixture of air and water thrown up from the blowhole of a whale ¹

4. Verb. to gush forth in a stream ¹

5. Verb. to speak tediously ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Spout

1. to eject in a rapid stream [v -ED, -ING, -S]

Medical Definition of Spout

1. 1. To throw out forcibly and abudantly, as liquids through an office or a pipe; to eject in a jet; as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk. "Who kept Jonas in the fish's maw Till he was spouted up at Ninivee?" (Chaucer) "Next on his belly floats the mighty whale . . . He spouts the tide." (Creech) 2. To utter magniloquently; to recite in an oratorical or pompous manner. "Pray, spout some French, son." (Beau. & Fl) 3. To pawn; to pledge; as, spout a watch. Origin: Cf. Sw. Sputa, spruta, to spout, D. Spuit a spout, spuiten to spout, and E. Spurt, sprit, v, sprout, sputter; or perhaps akin to E. Spit to eject from the mouth. 1. To issue with with violence, or in a jet, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout; as, water spouts from a hole; blood spouts from an artery. "All the glittering hill Is bright with spouting rills." (Thomson) 2. To eject water or liquid in a jet. 3. To utter a speech, especially in a pompous manner. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Spout Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Spout

spousal
spousal equivalent
spousal relationship
spousal support
spousally
spousals
spouse
spouse abuse
spouse equivalent
spousebreach
spoused
spouseless
spouses
spousess
spousing
spout (current term)
spouted
spouter
spouters
spoutfish
spoutfishes
spouthole
spoutholes
spoutier
spoutiest
spouting
spoutings
spoutless
spouts
spoutshell

Literary usage of Spout

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Merry's Museum (1844)
"THE water-spout is a strange meteor, which has attracted a good deal of ... Dr. Franklin's opinion was that a water-spout and a whirlwind proceed from the ..."

2. Popular Lectures on Science and Art: Delivered in the Principal Cities and by Dionysius Lardner (1846)
"Difference between Water and Land spout*.—Land-spout at Montpellier. ... Meteor at Carcassonne.—Meteor at Dreux and Mantes.—Land-spout at ..."

3. The New American Cyclopaedia: A Popular Dictionary of General Knowledge by George Ripley (1858)
"WATER spout, a column apparently of cloud or water, appearing in certain cases ... This whirling movement of the spout or column is universal ; and the fact ..."

4. A Concise Etymological Dictionary of the English Language by Walter William Skeat (1901)
"(E.) The frequentative of spout. It means ' to keep on spouting out ' ; hence to speak rapidly and indistinctly. Cf. Du. dial. ..."

5. The new and complete dictionary of the English languageby John Ash by John Ash (1795)
"spout'ed (p. from fpout) Toured out with violence. spout'inp (pa from .pout) Pouring ... spout'ing {¡./rom tbe part.) The aâ of pouring out with violence. ..."

6. Bulletin by New Zealand Geological Survey (1912)
"spout Hollow pit.—A half mile west of the Roseberry quarry, on the north side of the road, and on the east slope of spout Hollow, there is a pit that covers ..."

7. The Annals of Philosophy by Richard Phillips, E W Brayley (1817)
"The course of this spout appears to have been over the country about Hampstead. ... He conceived the spout to touch the top of the tree under which he had ..."

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