Definition of Squirish

1. of, resembling, or befitting a squire [adj]



Squirish Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Squirish

squiredom
squiredoms
squireen
squireens
squirehood
squirehoods
squirelike
squireling
squirelings
squirely
squires
squireship
squireships
squiress
squiring
squirish (current term)
squirm
squirmage
squirmed
squirmer
squirmers
squirmier
squirmiest
squirminess
squirming
squirmingly
squirmish
squirms
squirmy
squirr

Literary usage of Squirish

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Westminster Review by John Chapman, Charles William Wason (1826)
"... that their state of servitude, when lords were still more lordly, and squires still more squirish than they are at present, was, though in another form, ..."

2. Grose's Classical Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue: Revised and Corrected ...by Francis Grose by Francis Grose (1823)
"A weak profligate spendthrift, the squire of the company; one who pays the whole reckoning, or treats the company, is called standing squire. squirish. ..."

3. That reminds me by Edward Richard Russell (1899)
"Next to me sat a healthy-looking squirish-sort of a gentleman, who paid most watchful attention to the discourse, but seemed very fidgety, moving about in ..."

4. The Letters of John B.S. Morritt of Rokeby Descriptive of Journeys in Europe by John Bacon Sawrey Morritt (1914)
"In the spring he must break in my young roans, and tell Anne (that in the list of squirish commissions no four-footed beast may be forgotten) I beg Rover ..."

5. Sporting Magazine edited by [Anonymus AC02751662] (1819)
"... And nut, a« once'he did," says Bill, " Among those Kings, so high and " Leave us, poor blacks, to fare as ill, '•As though we were but pigs, squirish, ..."

6. The Cid Ballads, and Other Poems and Translations from Spanish and German by James Young Gibson, Margaret Dunlop Gibson, Agnes Smith Lewis (1887)
"The spade and hoe, methinks, are now at one With errant enterprise; and plain attire And squirish speech rebuke the proud desire That fain would spurn the ..."

7. The Cid Ballads, and Other Poems and Translations from Spanish and German by James Young Gibson, Margaret Dunlop Gibson (1898)
"The spade and hoe, methinks, are now at one With errant enterprise; and plain attire And squirish speech rebuke the proud desire That fain would spurn the ..."

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