Definition of Startle

1. Noun. A sudden involuntary movement. "He awoke with a start"




2. Verb. To stimulate to action. "The good news will startle her"; "Galvanized into action"

3. Verb. Move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm. "She startled when I walked into the room"
Exact synonyms: Jump, Start
Generic synonyms: Move
Specialized synonyms: Shy, Boggle, Rear Back, Jackrabbit
Derivative terms: Jump, Start

Definition of Startle

1. v. t. To move suddenly, or be excited, on feeling alarm; to start.

2. v. t. To excite by sudden alarm, surprise, or apprehension; to frighten suddenly and not seriously; to alarm; to surprise.

3. n. A sudden motion or shock caused by an unexpected alarm, surprise, or apprehension of danger.

Definition of Startle

1. Verb. To move suddenly, or be excited, on feeling alarm; to start. ¹

2. Verb. To excite by sudden alarm, surprise, or apprehension; to frighten suddenly and not seriously; to alarm; to surprise. ¹

3. Verb. To deter; to cause to deviate. ¹

4. Noun. A sudden motion or shock caused by an unexpected alarm, surprise, or apprehension of danger. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Startle

1. to frighten or surprise suddenly [v -TLED, -TLING, -TLES]

Startle Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Startle

starting handle
starting line
starting motor
starting pitcher
starting pitchers
starting point
starting points
starting post
starting signal
starting stalls
starting time
starting up
startingly
startings
startish
startle (current term)
startle reaction
startle reflex
startle response
startled
startlement
startlements
startler
startlers
startles
startling
startlingly
startlish
startly
starts

Literary usage of Startle

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. American Poets and Their Theology by Augustus Hopkins Strong (1916)
"He aimed to startle even here. His criticisms commanded attention indeed. Within a few months he increased the circulation of a magazine from five to ..."

2. American Poets and Their Theology by Augustus Hopkins Strong (1916)
"He aimed to startle even here. His criticisms commanded attention indeed. Within a few months he increased the circulation of a magazine from five to ..."

3. Ainsworth's Magazine: A Miscellany of Romance, General Literature, & Art by William Harrison Ainsworth, George Cruikshank, Hablot Knight Browne (1843)
"... which one als t£ from mortal ken and thou hast already seen enough of me not ow lh startle me with thoughts of ..."

4. An Etymological Dictionary of the Scottish Language ...: To which is by John Jamieson (1880)
"tt. a/tip, faux, as in the form of the countenance denoted by this word, the chop» appear fallen. But as A. Bor. gloppen signifies to startle ..."

5. Appletons' Annual Cyclopaedia and Register of Important Events (1875)
"I think the number will startle. It will be up in the thousands. The city is perfectly quiet. No trouble is apprehended. I shall send you this evening a ..."

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