Definition of Syncope

1. Noun. A spontaneous loss of consciousness caused by insufficient blood to the brain.

Exact synonyms: Deliquium, Faint, Swoon
Generic synonyms: Loss Of Consciousness
Derivative terms: Faint, Faint, Swoon



2. Noun. (phonology) the loss of sounds from within a word (as in 'fo'c'sle' for 'forecastle').
Exact synonyms: Syncopation
Category relationships: Phonemics, Phonology
Generic synonyms: Articulation
Derivative terms: Syncopate, Syncopate

Definition of Syncope

1. n. An elision or retrenchment of one or more letters or syllables from the middle of a word; as, ne'er for never, ev'ry for every.

Definition of Syncope

1. Noun. A loss of consciousness when someone faints, a swoon. ¹

2. Noun. (prosody) A missing sound from the interior of a word, for example by changing cannot to can't or the pronunciation of placenames in -cester (e.g. Leicester) as -ster. ¹

3. Noun. A missed beat or off-beat stress in music resulting in syncopation. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Syncope

1. the contraction of a word by omitting one or more sounds from the middle [n -S] : SYNCOPAL, SYNCOPIC [adj]

Syncope Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Syncope

synclinoria
synclinorium
syncollin
syncom
syncoms
syncopal
syncopate
syncopated
syncopates
syncopating
syncopation
syncopations
syncopative
syncopator
syncopators
syncope (current term)
syncopes
syncopic
syncopist
syncopists
syncopize
syncopized
syncopizes
syncopizing
syncotyledonous
syncranterian
syncranteric
syncretic
syncretical
syncretically

Literary usage of Syncope

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. A System of Surgery by Frederick Treves, Sir Charles B Ball (1895)
"syncope. — syncope and shock must be carefully separated from each other. The actual state of syncope is preceded, when the patient is conscious, ..."

2. The Latin Language: An Historical Account of Latin Sounds, Stems and Flexions by Wallace Martin Lindsay (1894)
"syncope. The syncope or suppression of an unaccented vowel is a c'ommon feature of languages which have a stress- accent, and is carried to the greatest ..."

3. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor, John James Reese (1873)
"Thus all causes which operate to produce death suddenly, as by syncope, asphyxia, or coma, especially demand the attention of a medical jurist. ..."

4. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor, John James Reese (1873)
"When the suspension of the motions of the heart is the primary cause of death, the person is said to die by syncope. The term asphyxia is applied to death ..."

5. The Practitioner by Gale Group, ProQuest Information and Learning Company (1873)
"So closely, indeed, are syncope and shock connected that they were considered by the celebrated surgeon, Travers,2 to differ in degree rather than in kind, ..."

6. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor (1892)
"When the suspension of the motions of the heart is the primary cause of death, the person is said to die by syncope. The term asphyxia is applied to death ..."

7. The Institutes of Medicine by Martyn Paine (1862)
"In the Medical and Physiological Commentaries, vol. i., p. 178 (1840), I proposed, in cases of obstinate and alarming syncope, the operation of ..."

8. Transactions by Cambridge Philological Society (1899)
"THE syncope OF -u- AFTER A LONG SYLLABLE. The examples of -u preserved in this ... The inscription of Kirkheaton has already eoh, but since the syncope here ..."

9. A System of Surgery by Frederick Treves, Sir Charles B Ball (1895)
"syncope. — syncope and shock must be carefully separated from each other. The actual state of syncope is preceded, when the patient is conscious, ..."

10. The Latin Language: An Historical Account of Latin Sounds, Stems and Flexions by Wallace Martin Lindsay (1894)
"syncope. The syncope or suppression of an unaccented vowel is a c'ommon feature of languages which have a stress- accent, and is carried to the greatest ..."

11. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor, John James Reese (1873)
"Thus all causes which operate to produce death suddenly, as by syncope, asphyxia, or coma, especially demand the attention of a medical jurist. ..."

12. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor, John James Reese (1873)
"When the suspension of the motions of the heart is the primary cause of death, the person is said to die by syncope. The term asphyxia is applied to death ..."

13. The Practitioner by Gale Group, ProQuest Information and Learning Company (1873)
"So closely, indeed, are syncope and shock connected that they were considered by the celebrated surgeon, Travers,2 to differ in degree rather than in kind, ..."

14. A Manual of Medical Jurisprudence by Alfred Swaine Taylor (1892)
"When the suspension of the motions of the heart is the primary cause of death, the person is said to die by syncope. The term asphyxia is applied to death ..."

15. The Institutes of Medicine by Martyn Paine (1862)
"In the Medical and Physiological Commentaries, vol. i., p. 178 (1840), I proposed, in cases of obstinate and alarming syncope, the operation of ..."

16. Transactions by Cambridge Philological Society (1899)
"THE syncope OF -u- AFTER A LONG SYLLABLE. The examples of -u preserved in this ... The inscription of Kirkheaton has already eoh, but since the syncope here ..."

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