Definition of Twaite

1. n. A European shad; -- called also twaite shad. See Shad.



2. n. A piece of cleared ground. See Thwaite.

Definition of Twaite

1. a British species of shad [n -S]

Medical Definition of Twaite

1. A European shad; called also twaite shad. See Shad. Origin: Prov. E. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Twaite Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Twaite

twaddled
twaddler
twaddlers
twaddles
twaddlier
twaddling
twaddly
twae
twaes
twafald
twagger
twaggers
twain
twain cloud
twains
twaite (current term)
twaites
twal
twals
twang
twanged
twanger
twangers
twangier
twangiest
twanging
twangingly
twangings
twangle
twangled

Literary usage of Twaite

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Life-histories of the British Marine Food-fishes by William Carmichael M'Intosh, Arthur Thomas Masterman (1897)
"THE twaite-SHAD. (Clupea finta, Cuv.) The eggs of this ally of the herring are deposited in fresh water, the fishes entering rivers for this purpose; ..."

2. Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Standard Work of Reference in Art, Literature (1907)
"They inhabit the coasts of temperate Europe, the twaite shad being more numerous in the Mediterranean. While they are in salt water they live singly or in ..."

3. A History of British Fishes by William Yarrell (1841)
"I suspect," says the note, " that the Shad and twaite are distinct species, ... I venture to propose the names of twaite Shad and Allice Shad for our two ..."

4. The Encyclopaedia Britannica: A Dictionary of Arts, Sciences, and General by Thomas Spencer Baynes (1888)
"Two species occur in Europe, much resembling each other, —one commonly called Allis Shad (Clupea alosa), and the other known as twaite Shad (Clupea finta). ..."

5. British Zoology by Thomas Pennant (1776)
"The twaite, on the contrary, weighs from half a pound to two pounds, which it never exceeds. The twaite differs from a ..."

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