Definition of Generation

1. Noun. All the people living at the same time or of approximately the same age.

Exact synonyms: Coevals, Contemporaries
Generic synonyms: People
Specialized synonyms: Youth Culture, Peer Group
Derivative terms: Generational



2. Noun. Group of genetically related organisms constituting a single step in the line of descent.
Generic synonyms: Biological Group
Specialized synonyms: Posterity, Baby Boom, Baby-boom Generation, Gen X, Generation X
Derivative terms: Generate, Generational

3. Noun. The normal time between successive generations. "They had to wait a generation for that prejudice to fade"
Generic synonyms: Period, Period Of Time, Time Period

4. Noun. A stage of technological development or innovation. "The third generation of computers"
Generic synonyms: Phase, Stage
Derivative terms: Generate, Generational

5. Noun. A coming into being.
Exact synonyms: Genesis
Generic synonyms: Beginning
Derivative terms: Generate, Generate

6. Noun. The production of heat or electricity. "Dams were built for the generation of electricity"
Generic synonyms: Production
Derivative terms: Generate, Generate

7. Noun. The act of producing offspring or multiplying by such production.
Exact synonyms: Multiplication, Propagation
Generic synonyms: Breeding, Facts Of Life, Procreation, Reproduction
Specialized synonyms: Biogenesis, Biogeny
Derivative terms: Generate, Multiply, Multiply, Propagate, Propagate, Propagate

Definition of Generation

1. n. The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals.

Definition of Generation

1. Noun. The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals. ¹

2. Noun. Origination by some process, mathematical, chemical, or vital; production; formation; as, the '''generation''' of sounds, of gases, of curves, etc ¹

3. Noun. That which is generated or brought forth; progeny; offspring. ¹

4. Noun. A period of around thirty years, the average amount of time before a child takes the place of its parents. ¹

5. Noun. A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy, or collectively the body of people who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one time. ¹

6. Noun. Race; kind; family; breed; stock. ¹

7. Noun. (geometry) The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude; as, the '''generation''' of a line or curve by the motion of a point, of a surface by a line, a sphere by a semicircle, etc. ¹

8. Noun. (biology) The aggregate of the functions and phenomena which attend reproduction. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Generation

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Generation

1. 1. The act of generating or begetting; procreation, as of animals. 2. Origination by some process, mathematical, chemical, or vital; production; formation; as, the generation of sounds, of gases, of curves, etc. 3. That which is generated or brought forth; progeny; offspiring. 4. A single step or stage in the succession of natural descent; a rank or remove in genealogy. Hence: The body of those who are of the same genealogical rank or remove from an ancestor; the mass of beings living at one period; also, the average lifetime of man, or the ordinary period of time at which one rank follows another, or father is succeeded by child, usually assumed to be one third of a century; an age. "This is the book of the generations of Adam." (Gen. V. 1) "Ye shall remain there [in Babylon] many years, and for a long season, namely, seven generations." (Baruch vi. 3) "All generations and ages of the Christian church." (Hooker) 5. Race; kind; family; breed; stock. "Thy mother's of my generation; what's she, if I be a dog?" (Shak) 6. The formation or production of any geometrical magnitude, as a line, a surface, a solid, by the motion, in accordance with a mathematical law, of a point or a magnitude; as, the generation of a line or curve by the motion of a point, of a surface by a line, a sphere by a semicircle, etc. 7. The aggregate of the functions and phenomene which attend reproduction. There are four modes of generation in the animal kingdom: scissiparity or by fissiparous generation, gemmiparity or by budding, germiparity or by germs, and oviparity or by ova. Alternate generation, the fancied production of living organisms without previously existing parents from inorganic matter, or from decomposing organic matter, a notion which at one time had many supporters; abiogenesis. Origin: OE. Generacioun, F. Generation, fr.L. Generatio. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Lexicographical Neighbors of Generation

generalness
generals
generals of the army
generalship
generalships
generalties
generalty
generant
generants
generatable
generate
generated
generated occlusal path
generates
generating
generation
generation X
generation effect
generation gap
generation gaps
generation loss
generation time
generational
generationally
generationer
generations
generative
generative empathy
generative medicine
generatively

Literary usage of Generation

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. Energy Policies of IEA Countries: Denmark; 2006 Review by International Energy Agency (2006)
"In 1973, oil-fired generation accounted for 64% of the total, but by 1990, oil's share had fallen to less than 4% while coal's share had risen to just over ..."

2. Electric Power Technology: Opportunities and Challenges of Competition by International Energy Agency (1999)
"Distributed generation Many observers predict an increasing share of distributed generation in competitive electricity markets. Distributed generation is ..."

3. Science by American Association for the Advancement of Science (1903)
"The first generation hybrids will all be D(R). Any one of them back-crossed with the recessive parent will produce fifty per cent, of pure recessive ..."

4. The Republic of Plato by Plato (1909)
""You will say," I suppose, "that the sun bestows on visible objects not only the quality of being seen, but also their generation, growth and nurture, ..."

5. The Contemporary Review (1871)
"And the analogy even of the divine- life process, as understood by Christian dogma, is favourable to the theory of generation, since in the divine life it ..."

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