Definition of Orchestra

1. Noun. A musical organization consisting of a group of instrumentalists including string players.


2. Noun. Seating on the main floor in a theater.
Generic synonyms: Seating, Seating Area, Seating Room, Seats
Group relationships: House, Theater, Theatre

Definition of Orchestra

1. n. The space in a theater between the stage and the audience; -- originally appropriated by the Greeks to the chorus and its evolutions, afterward by the Romans to persons of distinction, and by the moderns to a band of instrumental musicians.

Definition of Orchestra

1. Noun. (music) A large group of musicians who play together on various instruments, usually including some from strings, woodwind, brass and/or percussion; the instruments played by such a group. ¹

2. Noun. A semicircular space in front of the stage used by the chorus in Ancient Greek and Hellenistic theatres. ¹

3. Noun. The area in a theatre or concert hall where the musicians sit, immediately in front of and below the stage, sometimes (also) used by other performers. ¹

¹ Source: wiktionary.com

Definition of Orchestra

1. [n -S]

Medical Definition of Orchestra

1. 1. The space in a theater between the stage and the audience; originally appropriated by the Greeks to the chorus and its evolutions, afterward by the Romans to persons of distinction, and by the moderns to a band of instrumental musicians. 2. The place in any public hall appropriated to a band of instrumental musicians. 3. Loosely: A band of instrumental musicians performing in a theater, concert hall, or other place of public amusement. Strictly: A band suitable for the performance of symphonies, overtures, etc, as well as for the accompaniment of operas, oratorios, cantatas, masses, and the like, or of vocal and instrumental solos. A band composed, for the largest part, of players of the various viol instruments, many of each kind, together with a proper complement of wind instruments of wood and brass; as distinguished from a military or street band of players on wind instruments, and from an assemblage of solo players for the rendering of concerted pieces, such as septets, octets, and the like. 4. The instruments employed by a full band, collectively; as, an orchestra of forty stringed instruments, with proper complement of wind instruments. Origin: L. Orchestra, Gr, orig, the place for the chorus of dancers, from to dance: cf. F. Orchestre. Source: Websters Dictionary (01 Mar 1998)

Orchestra Pictures

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Lexicographical Neighbors of Orchestra

orchardman
orchardmen
orchards
orchat
orchats
orchel
orchella
orchellas
orchels
orcheo-
orcheses
orchesis
orchesography
orchestian
orchestra hit
orchestra pit
orchestral
orchestral bells
orchestrally
orchestras
orchestrate
orchestrated
orchestrater
orchestraters
orchestrates
orchestrating
orchestration
orchestrational

Literary usage of Orchestra

Below you will find example usage of this term as found in modern and/or classical literature:

1. The Encyclopedia Americana: A Library of Universal Knowledge (1920)
"In the centre the orchestra formed an exact circle in the middle of which stood the altar ... Round the orchestra, in size rather more than a semi-circle, ..."

2. Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians: Being the Sixth Volume of the by George Grove, Waldo Selden Pratt, Charles Newell Boyd (1920)
"21a, a selection from the West Country, for orchestra. ... 30, for chorus and orchestra (1910, given at Gardiner concerts) (Stainer). ..."

3. American Journal of Archaeology by Archaeological Institute of America (1891)
"Through most of the orchestra it cuts the native white clay; but from the space marked on the plan as " excavated below the level of orchestra" to the point ..."

4. An Almanack for the Year of Our Lord by Joseph Whitaker (1869)
"Symphony Orchestra, the programme at the first concert including ... The isth anniversary concert of the National Youth Orchestra took place at the Festival ..."

5. Famous Composers and Their Works by John Knowles Paine, Theodore Thomas, Karl Klauser (1891)
"Male choruses with orchestra; the first has become celebrated. Op. 20. ... A great work for Chorus and Orchestra. Op. 22. Does not exist ! ..."

6. The German Element in the United States by Albert Bernhardt Faust (1909)
"The most important of all by far was the Germania Orchestra. ... In this orchestra there could be found a soloist for every instrument, and the beginning ..."

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